BACC 6th Annual Golf Scramble

BACC 6th Annual Golf Tournament 

The Bay Area Chamber of Commerce is thrilled to announce our 6th Annual Golf Scramble which will be held on September 21st at Coos Golf Club. 


The BACC Annual Golf tournament purpose is to raise funds and bring added networking and advertising opportunities to our members.  

HOLE sponsorships provide our business members both opportunities.  
 
Last year over 135 golfers, 40 sponsors and countless volunteers joined us. 

All eighteen holes were sponsored by Chamber businesses, each set up challenges and games for the golfers as they made their way around the course.  This proved to be a great networking opportunity for both the golfer and the business sponsor.    

 A Hole in One Prize featured a new car provided by KenWare Super Store.   
Our community was so generous in providing wonderful GIFTS.
 
Each ITEM was displayed with the donors’ LOGO and a description of the item. 

The raffle ticket purchaser was given the opportunity to shop the items and place their ticket in the “jar” of the prize they wanted to win.   This was great exposure for the donor and the attendees loved having the opportunity to see what prizes were available to win. 
 

TEAM SIGN UP SHEET



PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS


Please give us a call if we may answer any questions for you. 

Thank you for your time and consideration. 

Your Sponsorship and/or Donation will add even more value to our tournament.

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Oregon Pacific Bank


Knife River Materials

LAT TUESDAYS

The Mission of the BACC Legislative Action Team (LAT) is to serve as an advocate for Chamber members and the business community in local and state issues impacting quality of life, growth, and profitability of member businesses and their employees. Purpose is to increase the Chamber’s influence in the development of public policy concerning issues of critical importance to the future of the Bay Area and its businesses. Gets in on the action at the Oregon legislative sessions and helps shape local government decisions that will maintain a healthy business climate. Conducts candidate forums during election years.

Join the BACC LAT which meets the first and third Tuesday, 7 am for video teleconferences, conference room at SWOCC (5th floor, room 505 Tioga Hall).

Contact: Tom Burdett 541-756-7142 tom@bntpromo.com

Legislative Update: May 28, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its Eighteenth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

The deadline for all policy bills has passed. Policy committees are now closed.

All legislation passed from this point forward will have to come from either the Rules, Revenue, or Ways & Means Committees. As we indicated last week, this signals that the 2019 session is in the final homestretch and that the decision-making will come down to just a handful of legislators in leadership. Most legislators will have little or nothing to do from this point forward other than casting votes on the floor.

Leadership is aiming toward a June 21 adjournment.

Activity on Major Issues

  • PERS Reform took center stage last week. SB 1049 passed the Senate with a bare 16 vote majority. Democrats needed 3 Republican votes to pass the bill. SB 1049 contains the following provisions:
    • Tier 1 and Tier 2 members, who are public employees who entered the PERS system before 2004, would have 2.5% of their salaries diverted from their individual retirement accounts into paying off the system’s debt.
    • Workers hired 2004 or later (PERS Tier 3 and Tier 4), would face a lower diversion – 0.75% of their salaries.
    • The biggest cost savings comes from a re-amortization of pension debt. Over 2/3 of the savings comes from this re-financing provision.
    • A reduction in assumed interest rate for retirees who use the “money match” method of calculating their pension benefits.
    • SAIF is largely held harmless.

      The future of SB 1049 in the House is uncertain. Although it is only a modest cost-saving measure, the unions will mount a full scale opposition campaign in the House that will make passage difficult. We do NOT expect a House vote in the coming days.

What happened last week?

  • Prevailing wages in enterprise zones (HB 2408). In a positive development, HB 2408 was killed late last week in the deal-making surrounding Measure 11 reform for juvenile offenders (SB 1008). House Republicans negotiated for a handful of bills in order to provide Democrats with the 4 votes they needed to secure passage of SB 1008. One of the issues that Republicans negotiated for was the death of HB 2408.

    OSCC opposed HB 2408, which would have required that prevailing wages be paid on all private enterprise zone projects valued at $20 million or more. The bill would have effectively killed one of Oregon’s last remaining effective economic development tools.

  • Cap-and-Trade (HB 2020). No activity on Cap-and-Trade last week. We are still waiting for the industry-approved amendments that OSCC and other business groups will be supporting as the bill sits in the Ways & Means Committee.
  • Lawsuit Damages (HB 2014). The Senate Judiciary Committee approved HB 2014 last week, as expected, on a party-line vote. HB 2014 would repeal Oregon’s legal limit of $500,000 on non-economic damages in personal injury and negligence lawsuit claims. OSCC, health care groups, and business organizations are opposing this legislation because it is a significant factor in driving up health care costs and general liability costs for employers. We are currently in a pitched battle on this issue in the Senate as we are fighting for the votes to stop this bill.

Other key issues coming up this week.

Remember, several business organizations have asked for passage of this proposal, thereby increasing the likelihood of passage. The theory was that if business did not support a paid family leave proposal in the 2019 session, we would be confronted with a ballot measure in 2020 that would propose a far more costly and unwieldy system.

Legislative Update: May 21, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its seventeenth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

This is the final week for policy committees to pass bills. Any bill not passed out of a policy committee (other than Rules or Revenue) is dead after Friday.

All legislation passed after Friday will have to come from either Rules, Revenue, or Ways & Means. This signals that the 2019 legislature is in the homestretch. It also signals that the decision-making will really come down to just a handful of legislators. Most legislators will have little or nothing to do from this point forward other than casting votes on the floor.

Democrat leadership can pass any bill it wants. The only reason there would need to be any negotiation whatsoever going forward is because:

  1. Republicans are still employing delay tactics which could be very impactful as the June 30th constitutional end date draws closer.
  2. Republicans have complete leverage on a key Measure 11 ‘reform’ bill sought by Democrats as Democrats do not have the votes to pass SB 1008 on their own.
  3. Republicans have some leverage on PERS reform as it is unlikely that Democrats can produce all the votes needed to pass SB 1049 on their own.
  4. Republicans have complete leverage on the “kicker” issue as Democrat leadership is seeking to be able to spend some of the $1.4 billion personal kicker.

Activity on Major Issues

  • The $2.8 billion Commercial Activity Tax (HB 3427) was signed into law by Governor Brown. Starting on January 1, 2020, all businesses doing business in Oregon will see:
    • A gross receipts tax rate of 0.57% on Oregon sales over $1 million;
    • A 35% deduction from taxable sales for labor OR business inputs, whichever is higher;
    • An exemption for groceries (defined as those that qualify for ‘SNAP’) and transportation fuel.
  • Cap-and-Trade (HB 2020). On Friday, HB 2020-A passed its first major milestone. After three hours of debate, the Joint Committee on Carbon Reduction adopted the -94 amendments on a party line vote and sent the bill to the Joint Committee on Ways & Means for further deliberation. Democrats voted down all other amendments that were brought forward, although it was widely acknowledged that rural Oregon would suffer job loss and economic hardship under the bill.

    The OSCC position has not changed since Day 1, primarily because the basic precepts of the legislation have not changed despite amendments that changed the bill on the margins. Transportation costs will increase. Natural gas costs will increase. Propane costs will increase. Local food processors and manufacturers will face a real competitive disadvantage. Small businesses and households will see increases in transportation and energy costs.

    OSCC still believes there are still opportunities to change this bill in the Ways & Means Committee.

What happened last week?

  • The state revenue forecast added $770 million to state coffers for the upcoming 2019-2021 biennium. Just from the last forecast in March, every metric grew by eye-popping numbers due to a historic influx of revenue over the tax season.

    In addition to the influx of $770 million into the upcoming budget cycle, the kicker almost doubled in size.  It’s now projected at $1.4 billion. Net reserve funds are now nearly $3.5 billion.

    But the real impact of the historic revenue forecast is that it will tamp down on talk of additional tax revenue for the remainder of the 2019 legislative session.

  • The legislature’s attempt at PERS reform was unveiled with Senate Bill 1049. SB 1049 contains the following provisions:
    • Tier 1 and Tier 2 members, who are public employees who entered the PERS system before 2004, would have 2.5% of their salaries diverted from their individual retirement accounts into paying off the system’s debt.
    • Workers hired 2004 or later (PERS Tier 3 and Tier 4), would face a lower diversion – 0.75% of their salaries.
    • Public employees earning less than $30,000 a year would be exempted.
    • A reduction in assumed interest rate for retirees who use the “money match” method of calculating their pension benefits.
    • Most significantly, legislators seem to have abandoned efforts to raid SAIF to cover PERS liability, which is a good development for Oregon employers.

The future of SB 1049 is uncertain. Although it is only a modest cost-saving measure, the unions oppose it in force and it is unlikely that majority Democrats can carry the issue themselves.

  • Equal Pay Technical Fixes (SB 123-A). On Tuesday, the Oregon Senate passed SB 123 unanimously. The bill includes several important technical fixes to give employers clarity in implementing Oregon’s Equal Pay Act. Oregon’s law is the most comprehensive in the country, and it has been difficult for many employers – large, small, and seasonal – to implement. OSCC supports these fixes, which streamline implementation and provide important protections to employers who are trying to do the right thing. We anticipate rulemaking later this year to address several other issues identified by Sen. Kathleen Taylor and Sen. Tim Knopp.

Other key issues coming up this week.

  • Prevailing wages in enterprise zones (HB 2408). We are expecting the Senate Workforce Committee to take up HB 2408 this week. In its current form, the bill requires prevailing wages to be paid on private enterprise zone projects of $20 million or more. OSCC is actively opposing and lobbying the legislation.
  • Lawsuit Damages (HB 2014). We are expecting the Senate Judiciary Committee to vote on HB 2014 this week. HB 2014 would repeal Oregon’s legal limit of $500,000 on non-economic damages in personal injury and negligence lawsuit claims. OSCC, health care groups, and business organizations are opposing this legislation because it is a significant factor in driving up health care costs and general liability costs for employers. Although we expect the Senate Judiciary Committee to approve the bill on a party line vote, we believe we have an opportunity to defeat the bill on the Senate floor.

ACTION ALERT

HB 2020: Cap-and-trade will increase the cost of living and working in Oregon – all residents will bear the cost of fuel increases and increased natural gas rates. It’s projected to immediately drive up the cost of gas by $0.16 per gallon, and natural gas customers will face double digit rate increase in the first year of the program!

There are fewer than 45-days before session adjourns, and NOW is the time to make your voice heard.

Legislative Update: May 14, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its sixteenth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

House and Senate Republicans ground the session to a crawl last week as both caucuses employed tactics designed to slow the pace of the session. Senate Republicans simply did not come to the capitol and effectively denied the necessary quorum to conduct Senate business.

Senate Republicans continue to negotiate with Senate President Peter Courtney on a slew of bills and a “go home” package. They hope to be able to come to agreement by Monday.

The result was an atypical slow legislative week in what would have otherwise been an intense week of jockeying as major deadlines loom. May 10th was the deadline for all policy bills to be posted for a work session in order to move forward. By May 24th, all bills must have been voted out of their second chamber policy committee in order to survive. Bills in Rules, Revenue, or Ways & Means will remain ‘in play’ through the end of session, although many of those committees will be wrapping up their work by mid-June.

Activity on Major Issues

  • The $2 billion Commercial Activity Tax (HB 3427) was most impacted by the work stoppage last week in the Senate. What was slated for an expedited Senate vote last Tuesday is still on hold.

HB 3427 includes the following components:

  • Gross receipts tax rate of 0.57% on top line sales over $1 million;
  • A 35% subtraction from receipts for labor OR the cost of goods sold (COGS), whichever is higher; and
  • An exemption for groceries (defined as those that qualify for ‘SNAP’ sold at retail).

Senate Republicans are trying to force the bill back to committee to lower the tax rate and/or increase the $1 million exemption. It is unclear whether they will be successful.

  • PERS Reform finally made an appearance (SB 1049). On Friday afternoon, Speaker Kotek and Senate President Courtney unveiled their plan to tackle PERS costs. Under their plan:
    • Tier 1 and Tier 2 members, who are public employees who entered the PERS system before 2004, would have 2.5% of their salaries diverted from their individual retirement accounts into paying off the system’s debt.
    • Workers hired 2004 or later (PERS Tier 3 and Tier 4), would face a lower diversion – 0.75% of their salaries.
    • Public employees earning less than $30,000 a year would be exempted.
    • A reduction in assumed interest rate for retirees who use the “money match” method of calculating their pension benefits.
    • Most significantly, legislators seem to have abandoned efforts to raid SAIF to cover PERS liability, which is a good development for Oregon employers.
  • Cap-and-Trade (HB 2020) Legislators unveiled the latest version of the carbon pricing bill in the -84 amendments last week. The amendments made a handful of changes, but failed to address some of the bigger affecting the business community such as the huge cost pressures associated natural gas and transportation fuel.

The new version of the bill contains the following:

  • Natural gas utilities receive 60% free allowances in 2021 that decline in 2022 in contrast to 100% for investor-owned electric utilities. Similar to California, these allowances are consigned, which limits how the utility can use them. That means many ratepayers-particularly industrial and commercial facilities-will see rate increases beginning in 2021.  This was not a win for local business communities.
  • Trade-exposed manufacturers and processors are assigned a benchmark of free allowances based on the best available technology.  This is an attempt to keep some of the state’s bigger job-providers from moving out-of-state.
  • Transportation fuels will bear the brunt of the cost increases in the early years of the cap-and-trade program.  A tax refund may be available for off-road fuels used in forestry and agriculture, but it is subject to a study of legal challenges.
  •  Assistance may be available to low income Oregonians to help cover cost increases for automobile fuels, propane, and home heating oil.

There is still a lot of work to be done, because as written, the -84 amendments will still result in a competitive disadvantage for local Oregon businesses. Our sources tell us that legislators plan to adopt the -84 amendment on Friday this week and pass the bill to Ways & Means. We will keep you updated as the process unfolds or as opportunities to weigh in come up.

  • Diesel Regulations (HB 2007) Negotiations have been ongoing on HB 2007, the on-road diesel engine retrofit and replacement bill. The bill is scheduled for a public hearing and work session early next week with an amendment that is expected to:
    • Scale down the phase-out and diesel retrofit requirement for on-road diesel engines to the tri-county (Metro) area which includes Clackamas County, Washington County, and Multnomah County.
    • By 2029, all heavy duty diesel trucks must have a 2007 or newer engine. Also by 2029, all medium duty diesel trucks must have a 2010 engine or newer. Farm vehicles and motor homes will be exempted.
  • Paid Family Leave (HB 2005Paid family leave has dominated the labor conversation this session. HB 2005 is the last remaining paid family leave bill, and it currently sits in the House Rules Committee. Labor unions have threatened a ballot measure in 2020 if HB 2005 fails to pass. However, a draft policy is currently in the works to forestall a ballot measure, including the below components (modeled loosely on Washington):
    • 12-weeks paid family and medical leave annually
    • All employees are eligible after they’ve earned $1,000
    • State-run insurance program, funded through payroll tax contributions
    • Payroll tax of up to 1% (60% employee paid, 40% employer paid)
    • Employers with 25 or fewer employees are not required to pay the premium
    • Job protection requirements come into effect after 90 days of employment
  • Marijuana Accommodation (SB 379) In a bit of good news, SB 379 is officially dead. This bill would have undermined and nullified all employers’ workplace drug-free policies and would have required employers to accommodate off-duty marijuana use. Although the Senate Judiciary Committee passed the bill on a party-line vote, Senate President Courtney refused to let it come to the Senate floor when it was clear that OSCC and other secured enough votes to defeat the bill.

Legislative Update: April 30, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its fourteenth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

Negotiations are underway on what a “go home” package of legislation would be for legislative Democrats who hold strong majorities in the legislature.

Legislative leadership appears to be signaling to the business community that they will pass:

  1. HB 3427, the $2 billion gross receipts tax on businesses with $1 million or more in sales. The details of the tax are still in discussion.
  2. An undefined PERS reform proposal.
  3. A paid family leave proposal that would require both employers and workers to pay new taxes.
  4. A buy down of PERS liabilities that would include about a $300 million contribution from SAIF.
  5. An amended version of Cap and Trade (HB 2020).

The one concession that leadership appears to be willing to make is to kill HB 2269, the employer health care tax. It is unclear at this point which policy bills will get wrapped up in the negotiation.

Activity on Major Issues

  • The $2 billion Commercial Activity Tax (HB 3427) is now clearly the top priority of legislative leadership. Although there was a serious effort to pass the bill out of committee on Thursday evening, the bill ultimately did not move.

Absent any real movement on negotiations with democrat leadership in the House and Senate, the bill is slated to move out of committee on Monday night.
As it stands, HB 3427 has the following components:

  • A gross receipts tax rate of 0.49% on Oregon sales over $1 million;
  • A 25% deduction from taxable sales for labor OR business inputs, whichever is higher;
  • An exemption for receipts from sales to a wholesaler or ag cooperative for any sales outside of Oregon; and
  • An exemption for groceries (defined as those that qualify for ‘SNAP’).
  • Cap-and-Trade (HB 2020). The Joint Committee on Carbon Reduction is scheduled to resume its work again this week with two meetings (Monday and Friday) to consider new amendments to HB 2020, the Cap-and-Trade bill. OSCC anticipates that amendments will be released Monday for consideration by the committee. We will keep you updated after we’ve had a chance to review changes in the amendments. The rumor is that there will be a serious attempt to pass HB 2020 out of committee right as early as next week (the week of May 6th).

What happened last week?

  • Employer Health Care Tax (HB 2269A). Last Monday, OSCC joined Oregon Business & Industry, Oregon Farm Bureau, and the Northwest Grocers in testifying in opposition to HB 2269A. This bill would require employers with 50 or more employees (who work at least 8 hours a week) to provide a minimum payment towards the employees’ health care or pay the state the difference. Although it’s not being called a “tax”, the Oregon Health Authority is projecting $0.50 per hour worked per employee and a total revenue generation of $500 million.
  • Sexual Harassment (SB 726A). SB 726A passed out of the Senate with a 23-6 vote. Individual liability for owners, officers and executives (who knew or should have known about the alleged harassment) remains out of the bill, but there are still concerns about the ability of small businesses to maintain records and data for the new 5-year statute of limitations to file harassment claims. Under the bill, employers are prohibited from using non-disclosure agreements as a means to settle harassment claims.
  • Pregnancy Accommodations (HB 2341A). HB 2341A moved out of the Senate Workforce Committee last week. As written, employers with 6+ employees must provide reasonable accommodations for pregnant employees, but any of those businesses may file an undue hardship exemption with BOLI. Easy final passage is expected on Senate floor.
  • Expressing Milk in the Workplace (HB 2593A). Under HB 2593A, all employers must provide reasonable rest periods for an employee to express milk during a child’s first 18 months. However, an employer with 10 or fewer employees may file an undue hardship exemption with BOLI. The next stop is the Senate floor for final passage.

Other key issues coming up this week.

The upcoming week is going to be fairly quiet on key issues. There will be no additional hearings on Cap and Trade this week, but there will be consideration of the following:

  • Prevailing wages in enterprise zones. HB 2408 requires prevailing wages on all private projects in Enterprise Zones in excess of $20 million. Such a policy erodes one of Oregon’s last remaining economic development tools. The bill easily passed the House and is already up for a public hearing in the Senate Workforce Committee on Tuesday. OSCC will issue an Action Alert on this critical economic development issue.
  • Workers’ compensation compromise. (HB 3022) OSCC initially testified against this legislation, which would have upended 30-years of successful workers’ compensation reforms and drastically raised workers’ comp costs on employers. However, the bill was deftly negotiated by SAIF so as to end up a compromise bill that won’t impact employer rates. The bill will see committee action in the House Rules Committee on Monday.

ACTION ALERT

OSCC will be issuing an Action Alert for HB 2408 this week. This bill, which will require prevailing wages in privately-funded Enterprise Zone projects of $20 million or more, would be a strong hindrance to much needed economic development projects. Enterprise Zones are one of Oregon’s last remaining viable economic development tools.

Legislative Update: April 02, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its eleventh week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

We’ve passed the first major deadline of the 2019 legislative session.

Bills needed to have been scheduled for committee votes by the end of this past Friday in order to stay alive. By Tuesday, April 9th, all bills need to actually be voted out of their original committee in order to survive.

At this point, it looks like about half of all legislation is now dead.

Among the bills that were killed on the Friday deadline: Anti-insurance industry bills (SB 728 and HB 2421), anti-forestry legislation (HB 2656), legislation that limits the enforceability of employment contracts (HB 2489), pro-business legislation fixing manufacturing overtime restrictions (SB 110), and all the PERS reform bills (SB 532 and SB 533).

But for the most part, the majority of relevant legislative threats to business are still alive.

Activity on Major Issues

The emergence of a new health care tax proposal from Governor Brown this week (HB 2269) and the full-scale threat of a new paid family leave bill (HB 2005) mean that the 2019 Oregon legislature could easily be the most costly legislature in history for local businesses.

Here are the four major tax hikes being pushed by legislative leaders. As of now, all four proposals are serious and viable:

  • Health Care Tax (HB 2269) This unbelievable proposal would give the Oregon Health Authority agency the authority to determine what every large employer (defined as 50+ employees!) should be spending on health care for employees and authorizes the agency to levy a tax on every employer that does not meet the agency’s minimum health care spending requirements. The bill is designed to raise a minimum $500 million per biennium in new taxes, although it isn’t subject to the supermajority vote requirement to raise revenue.
  • Paid Family Leave (HB 2005) Legislative leaders introduced this bill as the newest and most refined effort to pass a paid family and medical leave system. Bottom line: the bill gives the Employment Department the authority to levy up to a 1% payroll tax on employers and a 1% income tax on employees to implement a 26-week per year paid family leave program. The bill would apply to all employers with at least one employee. The bill must raise at least $1 billion in new taxes every biennium to fund a solvent problem.
  • Cap & Trade (HB 2020) The new re-write of HB 2020, the ‘Cap & Trade’ bill, did nothing to alleviate cost concerns for manufacturers or everyday Oregonians. The new version of the bill would immediately add 16 cents per gallon in fuel costs and an immediate 30% increase in natural gas costs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. Large manufacturers will see similar and immediate cost increases for electricity. All told, we are still analyzing this bill as a $1.4 billion increase in costs for Oregonians each biennium. The vast majority of direct costs will be borne by manufacturing and transportation.
  • Business Tax Increase. Our expectation is that Democratic leadership will lean toward selecting a Commercial Activity Tax, which is a pure gross receipts tax, as the basis for implementing a new business tax to add more than $2 billion in revenue each biennium into the state’s K-12 system. At this point, it does not appear that PERS reform or any other government cost savings will accompany this tax proposal. A growing coalition of business organizations, including OSCC, are now going on record as opposing a new gross receipts tax.
What is the total biennial cost to the all the tax increases that are now on the table? $5 billion.

Other Key Issues Coming up This Week.

  • Marijuana Accommodation (SB 379) Our biggest disappointment of the Friday deadline was that the Senate Judiciary Committee is going to attempt to pass its marijuana accommodation bill. OSCC felt very strongly that we had helped defeat this bill, but Senate Judiciary Committee chair Floyd Prozanski (D-Eugene) is going to make a last minute push to pass it. SB 379 would undermine and nullify all employers’ workplace drug-free policies and would require employers to accommodate off-duty marijuana use.Please respond to the OSCC ACTION ALERT on SB 379. We need to mount our defense on this issue in the Oregon Senate NOW!! The bill is scheduled for committee vote late this week.

ACTION ALERT

Legislative Update: March 19, 2019
The 2019 legislative session is starting its ninth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

This is the week that Senate President Peter Courtney is slated to return to the legislature from his 10-day ‘medical leave.’ Many have speculated that President Courtney will take the opportunity to step away from leadership and the legislature, but we have no reason to believe this is the case. We expect him to return.

We continue to be amazed that every major revenue-raising proposal is still on the front-burner so far this session. There continues to be a full court press by legislative leadership to pass a major business tax increase and a carbon pricing bill (cap and trade) and a paid family leave system, and another round of Medicaid taxes. The cumulative tax impact of all of these measures could easily approach $5 billion per biennium!

Finally, the flood of new 2019 legislation has ended. New bills are now coming out in a trickle. As of this today, about 2,500 pieces of legislation have been introduced for the 2019 legislative session. This represents approximately 90% – 95% of all the legislation we expect to see in 2019.

From this point forward, every legislator has five (5) priority bills that they can introduce. This means we could potentially see another 450 bills introduced, but it is more likely that we’ll see just a fraction of that amount.

The next few weeks will be intense due to looming deadlines. Bills need to be posted for committee votes by the end of Friday, March 29th in order to receive further consideration. By Tuesday, April 9th, all bills need to be voted out of their original committee in order to survive.

Activity on Major Issues

  • Cap & Trade. (HB 2020) On Monday, the Joint Committee on Carbon Reduction heard from the Oregon Department of Forestry about sequestration on Oregon forestland.  The report explained that Oregon forests sequester half of all carbon that we emit annually (31 million metric tons of carbon). The presentation was eye-opening, particularly since Oregon’s carbon reduction goals that were set in the early 2000s were developed without acknowledgment of the sequestration potential from Oregon’s farms, forestlands, or even urban tree stands. In light of this new information,the state is already well-on-its-way to meeting the carbon reduction goals established by the bill.  The Joint Committee is still working on amendments to HB 2020, which should be available at the end of the week.We are expecting brand new amendments, and perhaps a total re-write of the bill, to be unveiled this week. We are not anticipating major improvements to the bill, but because the amendments are being closely guarded, we really have no idea what the new amendments will include. There are currently not enough votes to pass this bill, but we believe a bill will pass. It will likely undergo numerous re-writes over the next few months to accommodate concerns from OSCC and others who represent businesses that will be impacted.
  • Kicker. (HB 2975) OSCC missed this bill, as did every other business group, but House Republicans found out at the 11th hour that HB 2975 included an accounting change that reduced the upcoming kicker by over $100 million by transferring this money into the next biennium. HB 2975 has the effect of adding an additional $100 million of revenue into the 2019-21 budget by taking it out of the $748 million personal income kicker due to taxpayers next year.
  • Corporate Tax Increases. We still believe the committee is leaning toward selecting a Commercial Activity Tax, which is a pure gross receipts tax, as the basis for implementing a new business tax. The debate here is how much the legislature wants to raise. House Democratic leadership wants to raise business taxes by $3.4 billion per biennium. Senate Democratic leadership wants to raise business taxes by $2 billion. We want all chambers and businesses to understand that the Commercial Activity Tax is being discussed ‘in addition to’ current business income taxes, not ‘in lieu of.’
  • Age Discrimination. (HB 2818)  On Wednesday, House Business & Labor Committee held a hearing on HB 2818, which makes it an unlawful employment practice for an employer to seek the age of an applicant or to include certain words or phrases in recruitment that suggest age preference. The most problematic part of HB 2818 is the penalty structure. Under this bill, a court may award liquidated damages equal to twice the economic compensatory damages awarded or $25,000, whichever is greater.  OSCC has joined a coalition business groups to oppose HB 2818.

Other Key Issues Coming up This Week

  • Lawsuit Damages. (HB 2014) We were very surprised to see this bill posted for a committee vote on Monday afternoon in House Judiciary. OSCC testified alongside local physicians and health care providers against HB 2014 in testimony that far outweighed the trial lawyer proponents. HB 2014 would repeal Oregon’s legal limit of $500,000 on non-economic damages in personal injury and negligence lawsuit claims. OSCC, health care groups, and business organizations are opposing this legislation because it is a significant factor in driving up health care costs and general liability costs for employers.
  • Lodging Taxes. (SB 595) We continue to be amazed at the movement of SB 595, which allows local government to use 30% of all new local lodging taxes to fund “affordable, workforce housing.” It passed the Senate Housing Committee two weeks ago and now gets consideration in the Senate Finance & Revenue Committee this week.
  • OregonSaves. (SB 164) OSCC has been working with the Treasury on an amendment to SB 164, which is scheduled to pass out of committee next week. As a reminder, SB 164 would assess civil penalties to businesses that fail to comply with the Oregon Retirement Savings Program requirements. OSCC joined other employer groups in supporting the -3 amendment to SB 164:
  1. Gives all businesses, regardless of size, two years to get in to compliance;
  2. Caps civil penalties, so businesses are not on the hook for unknown costs; and
  3. Ensures that training and education are the first steps towards compliance.
  • 2% Kicker. (SJR 23) The Senate Finance & Revenue Committee will be considering the referral of a ballot measure that would put all 2% personal kicker monies into an account to fund education.

ACTION ALERT

  • OSCC has issued an ACTION ALERT for HB 2498 (Independent Contractors) for the House of Representatives. THANK YOU FOR THE GREAT RESPONSES. OSCC is literally changing the outcome on this legislation! Let’s continue to pour it on! To date OSCC has generated 201 letters to legislators on this bill.
  • OSCC has issued an ACTION ALERT for HB 2020 (Cap & Trade) for all legislators. PLEASE RESPOND ASAP WITH YOUR MESSAGE. To date, OSCC has generated 208 letters to legislators on this bill. Our goal is 1,000.

Save the Date for Family Leave Hearing!

On Monday, March 25 at 6pm, the House Business & Labor Committee and Senate Workforce Committee plan to host a joint public hearing on paid family & medical leave bills that would SIGNIFICANTLY alter Oregon’s business climate.  We need local Chambers to show up that evening to speak out about the impact of this extreme legislation!  An action alert will follow later this week.

What do the bills do?

HB 3031 (requires 3/5 vote)

  • Applies to employers with 1+ employees
  • Mandates 32 weeks of paid and protected family and medical leave each year
  • Establishes new payroll tax of up to 1%:
    • 0.5% paid by employers
    • 0.5% paid by employees
    • Creates state run family insurance program
    • Doesn’t allow employers to provide substantially similar plans/ currently existing plans

HB 3140 / SB 947 (don’t require 3/5 vote)

  • Expands OFLA eligibility to 1+ employees
  • Expands family member definition
  • Mandates 24 weeks of paid and protected leave AND an additional 24 weeks of unpaid family and medical leave each year
  • Requires 100% of employee wages to be paid 100% by employers while employee is on leave

Legislative Update: March 13, 2019
The 2019 legislative session is starting its eighth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)
What a week!

First off, Senate President Peter Courtney takes a 10-day ‘medical leave’ to deal with the stress of the session and its impact on his Grave’s Disease. There is wide speculation that he may not return. We aren’t able to separate fact from fiction at this point, so our assumption is that he will return. If he does not return, the trajectory of the session and the Democrats’ ability to pass major progressive legislative priorities is certainly imperiled.

The second major event of the week was the release of the Ways & Means Co-Chairs’ 2019-21 budget blueprint. The budget proposal only left K-12 and Medicaid harmless. All other state programs, including early education, higher education, and CTE were cut short of ‘current service levels.’ The hue and cry that ensued, primarily from the government employee unions and higher education advocates, added more fuel and momentum for additional business taxes.

Finally, we have grown increasingly concerned that SAIF Corporation will indeed be targeted for a raid of its workers’ compensation claims reserves to buy down PERS rates for K-12. We have reached this conclusion as it has become clear that any increase in business taxes will be absorbed almost totally by increased PERS costs within two short years. This would make it much less likely that business and/or voters would approve of any additional taxes.

We are getting the distinct impression that Democratic leadership will try and force a choice to buy down PERS rates: either suspend the $748 million personal ‘kicker’ and divert it to paying down PERS rates for K-12 schools or face the prospect of taking a similar amount out of SAIF’s reserves.

Activity on Major Issues

  • Cap & Trade. (HB 2020) We are expecting brand new amendments, and perhaps a total re-write of the bill, to be unveiled the week of March 18th. We are not anticipating major improvements to the bill, but because the amendments are being closely guarded, we are unsure of what the new amendments will include.
  • Independent Contractors. (HB 2498) OSCC was very successful in getting quick grassroots feedback into the House Rules Committee in opposition to HB 2498. As a quick reminder, HB 2498 would have turned Oregon’s independent contracting laws upside down, jeopardizing thousands of jobs.  OSCC joined several other business organizations to testify last Monday. We were joined by Keizer Chamber’s Dan Kohler, who spoke about about the detrimental impacts to insurance, funeral home, and salon contractors. The Committee is weighing options as it considers a different path forward. Thank you to Bend Chamber and all who weighed in!
  • Corporate Tax Increases. It is becoming clearer that the Revenue Subcommittee of the Joint Student Success Committee is starting to hone in on a new Commercial Activities Tax (CAT) as the basis for adding new revenue to the state’s K-12 system. There is an outside chance the committee may support a Business Activity Tax (which allows deductions for capital expenditures), but early indications are that Democratic leadership is favoring the CAT, which in its current modeling, would be a straight 0.48% tax against a company’s topline sales. This would be in addition to Oregon’s corporate income tax. The subcommittee is clearly trying to raise a net $1 billion extra per year from Oregon companies.
  • Lawsuit Damages. (HB 2014) OSCC testified alongside local physicians and health care providers against HB 2014 in the House Committee on Judiciary. HB 2014 would repeal Oregon’s legal limit of $500,000 on non-economic damages in personal injury and negligence lawsuit claims.  OSCC, health care groups, and business organizations are opposing this legislation because it is a significant factor in driving up health care costs and general liability costs for employers.

Other Key Issues Coming up This Week

  • Employment contracts. (HB 2489) OSCC is closely watching HB 2489, which would substantially shift the relationship between employers and employees in Oregon. The bill eliminates an employer’s ability to enforce agreements if they aren’t written and disallows employment contracts of longer than two years. A preliminary hearing is scheduled this week in House Business and Labor.
  • OregonSaves penalties. (SB 164) This bill is tentatively scheduled for a work session on Thursday. SB 164 would add penalties to the Oregon Retirement Savings Program, which passed in 2015. OSCC worked with the Treasury and other business stakeholders to address our concerns with the initial bill, and these changes will be reflected in a -3 amendment.
  • Age discrimination. (HB 2818) The House Committee on Business and Labor is planning to host a hearing on HB 2818 on Wednesday. This bill makes it clear that employers may not screen job applicants based on age and adds new and substantial penalties to violation of age discrimination laws.

ACTION ALERTS

Legislative Update: March 05, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its seventh week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

The legislature continues to be a very tumultuous and uncertain place. The Senate is currently mired in a leadership struggle as a handful of progressive Democrats and some Republicans are looking to topple Senate President Peter Courtney. This leadership struggle is taking up precious bandwidth in the Senate and is bogging down the process as Senators are more focused on the leadership issues than anything else.

The death of Secretary of State Dennis Richardson this past week also cast a pall over the session, both emotionally and from a process standpoint. The Governor has the lawful ability to appoint a successor to the late Secretary Richardson, and has stated her intention to find a ‘placeholder’ who will promise not to run for election in 2020.

This upcoming week is going to represent a major milestone in the 2019 session as the ‘Co-Chairs Budget’ will be released. This is the legislative response to the Governor’s budget that shows how state budget writers would craft the state budget with available resources. It is the first key budget blueprint that shows how the state’s money would be allocated without any additional tax increases. The ‘Co-Chairs Budget’ provides the budgetary foundation for all additional tax and revenue discussions. Usually, it will spawn advocacy for additional taxes and budget investments.

Activity on Major Issues

  • Cap & Trade hearings provided a dose of reality.  Hearings in the past week in Newport, Baker City, The Dalles, and Bend provided lawmakers with the stark reality that not all Oregonians are clamoring to pay more for their gasoline, natural gas or electricity to put only a very miniscule dent in Oregon’s greenhouse gas reductions. In what was expected to be a showcase for the organizing strength of the environmental activists, something else happened….regular working Oregonians showed up and voiced their displeasure with HB 2020 and its associated costs.
  • Medicaid taxes passed. Final passage of the first major Medicaid funding bill, HB 2010, happened this past week. The bill raised over $500 million and will go a long way to closing the state’s $623 million budget gap. OSCC issued a floor letter on HB 2010. Our intention was to make sure that legislators understood that HB 2010 will raise over $291 million per biennium from local businesses. It was the first major business cost increase from the 2019 session.
  • Rent control passed. The statewide rent control bill, SB 608, also passed the House and became law as Governor Brown quickly signed the bill. It is the first statewide rent control bill in the nation and limits annual rent increases to 7% plus CPI on buildings over 15 years old.
  • OSCC opposed HB 3022 which overturns Oregon’s landmark workers’ compensation reforms. OSCC testified against HB 3022 last week, a bill that would have reversed many key, cost-saving provisions in Oregon’s workers’ compensation system. Before 1990, Oregon had the highest frequency of workplace injury claims, third highest medical costs, and sixth highest premium costs. Today, we have some of the lowest rates in the country and safety programs that help reduce workplace injuries. Oregon’s workers’ compensation insurance system is one of the last remaining competitive advantages for Oregon companies and OSCC will vigilantly safeguard the system from being compromised.
  • Oregon revenue forecast added another $67 million to state coffers for the upcoming 2019-21 budget cycle. The state is experiencing a rush of short-term revenue that will slightly ease the budget crunch for the upcoming budget cycle. The “kicker” rebate projection was also increased to a whopping $748 million.

Other Key Issues Coming up This Week

  • Independent Contractors. (HB 2498) On Monday afternoon, the House Rules Committee will consider importing California’s troubled Dynamex decision. In April 2018, the California Supreme Court determined that independent contractors must meet a new strict “ABC” test in order to maintain their status. That decision impacted 2 million independent contractors in California, making them employees! Now Oregon is looking to follow suit. HB 2498 would add a new test to Oregon’s independent contractors: “Do you provide a service different from the business you are working for?” If the answer is “no,” HB 2498 would reclassify you as an employee of the business. Implications are broad-doctors, hairstylists, insurance agents, realtors, and many others will be impacted if HB 2498 passes.
  • Lawsuit Damages. (HB 2014) This bill is scheduled for a public hearing in the House Committee on Judiciary this Tuesday. HB 2014 would repeal Oregon’s legal limit of $500,000 on non-economic damages in personal injury and negligence lawsuit claims. OSCC, health care groups, and business organizations have traditionally opposed this legislation because it is a significant factor in driving up health care costs and general liability costs for employers.
  • Transient Lodging Taxes for workforce housing. (SB 595) This may clear its first hurdle this week in the Senate Housing Committee. SB 595 would allow local governments to use previously dedicated TLT funds and apply them to local workforce housing development. Currently, 70% of these revenues are statutorily dedicated to tourism and tourism promotion. If the committee approves the bill, it will be forwarded to the Senate Finance & Revenue Committee.
  • OregonSaves penalties. (SB 164) This bill is scheduled for a work session on Thursday. SB 164 would add penalties to the Oregon Retirement Savings Program, which passed in 2015. OSCC worked with the Treasury and other business stakeholders to address our concerns with the initial bill, and these changes will be reflected in a -2 amendment.

ACTION ALERT

  • OSCC has issued an ACTION ALERT for HB 2020 (Cap & Trade) for all legislators. PLEASE RESPOND ASAP WITH YOUR MESSAGE. To date, OSCC has generated 174 letters to legislators on this bill, well short of our goal of 1,000.
  • OSCC has issued an ACTION ALERT for SB 379 (Workplace Marijuana Accommodation) in the Senate. PLEASE RESPOND ASAP WITH YOUR MESSAGE TO SENATORS! (Senators only) To date, OSCC has generated 72 letters to Senators on this legislation, well short of our goal of 250.

OSCC continues to ask for your assistance to shine a light on the negative impacts of cap-and-trade!  Individual chambers can start by joining the  Partnership for Oregon Communities.  The Partnership will coordinate grassroots voices with concerns about the rising costs of fuel and energy.  Email jessicac@oregonchamber.org to join the coalition.  OSCC will follow up as we learn of opportunities for public testimony and engagement with the legislature.

Legislative Update: Feb. 19, 2019
The 2019 legislative session is starting its fifth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

We have now completed four weeks of the 2019 legislative session. No deadlines are imminent. Committees have a full two months to work on current legislation. New bills continue to dribble out at a very slow pace – about 1,800 pieces of legislation have been introduced so far.

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

Our observations are largely unchanged from last week.

The two major bills that are moving quickly – rent control (SB 608) and the first Medicaid funding bill (HB 2010) – will likely get very close to final passage this week.

The other major bill now in full swing – cap and trade (HB 2020) – will get a public hearing in the Capitol on Monday night, a public hearing in Springfield on Friday, and a public hearing in Medford on Saturday.

Additionally, as we noted last week, the legislative conversations are now underway on a major business tax to fund K-12 education. This discussion is happening in the Joint Student Success Committee on Tuesday evenings. Already, it appears there are major hurdles to passing additional tax revenues for schools – namely the potential cumulative effect of all the tax and regulatory bills that Legislative Democratic leadership wants to pass before considering a new business tax for schools.

Activity on Major Issues

This week will be a very busy week of new policy discussions which will impact the local business communities across Oregon:

  • Medicaid Funding will likely pass the House and maybe even the Senate. (HB 2010) This is the bill that will implement the first stages of Medicaid funding proposed by the Governor – the Hospital provider tax ($98 million) and the insurance/provider tax ($410 million). OSCC has ascertained that $291.6 million of this package will be a direct tax on small business health insurance premiums. This is the first direct tax on local business in the 2019 legislative session.
  • Rent Control will get a Senate vote this week. (SB 608) After passing the Senate last week on a party-line vote of 17-11, we expect this bill to pass quickly out of the House Human Services Committee on Wednesday this week. SB 608 has two key features: (1) it limits rent increases to 7% plus CPI in all buildings over 15 years old, and (2) disallows no-cause evictions after one year.
  • Cap & Trade public hearings now in full swing. (HB 2020) There will be three hearings on Cap & Trade this week. Monday evening at 5pm in the Capitol. Friday at noon at the Springfield City Hall. Saturday at 9am at Central Medford High School.  OSCC participation will be needed. OSCC has issued an ACTION ALERT with messaging points.
  • Small business tax cut repeal. (SB 211) OSCC is disappointed, but not surprised, to see the Senate Finance & Revenue Committee taking up the issue of repealing Oregon’s lower tax rates for pass-through businesses on Tuesday. Oregon’s ‘small business tax cut’ law currently imposes lower tax rates on the first $5 million of business income. SB 211 would apply lower tax rates to only the first $415,000 of business income and then would completely repeal the ‘small business tax cut’ altogether starting in 2026. We do not yet know how this issue will develop.

Other Key Issues Coming up This Week

  • Unemployment Insurance for Federal Employees. (SB 722) We will be watching this issue closely as legislators are looking to extend unemployment benefits to federal workers (who do not pay into the state system) in the event of a federal government shutdown. It appears the financial impacts of the legislation are negligible, but it does represent an additional demand on the state unemployment system which is neither paid for nor accounted for.
  • Property taxes. The Senate Finance and Revenue committee will take testimony on proposals to repeal property tax limits (Measure 50). We do not believe this issue will get traction in 2019, but we do believe that momentum is gradually growing for property tax reform that would loosen current limits or re-establish market value as the basis for tax assessments.
  • Transient Lodging Taxes for workforce housing. (SB 595) Interesting proposal in Senate Housing Committee this week that would allow local governments to use previously dedicated TLT funds and apply them to local workforce housing development. This represents yet another potential fight for TLT funds, which to date, are 70% dedicated to tourism and tourism promotion.
  • Broadband Deployment / Cell Phone Taxes. (HB 2173, HB 2184) An interesting debate is taking shape on the issue of broadband deployment and fully capitalizing the Oregon Universal Service Fund (OUSF) which finances broadband infrastructure. Currently, landline carriers must pay into the OUSF (this money is collected in a tax on customers) while wireless carriers are exempted. HB 2184 would eliminate the exemption on wireless carriers, which would translate effectively into a ‘cell phone’ tax. This issue pits the landline carriers versus the wireless carriers. In the meantime, traditionally conservative rural groups (ie The Oregon Farm Bureau) are supporting the tax. The House Economic Development Committee is hosting this debate. OSCC does not yet know the direction of this issue.
  • Bans on single-use checkout bags, polystyrene containers. The House Environment and Energy Committee will host a public hearing on legislation to ban the use of single-use plastic checkout bags and polystyrene containers that are popular for take-out food. The plastic bag ban is HB 2509, and the polystyrene container ban is HB 2883.
  • Health care data. (SB 703) The Senate Judiciary Committee will consider legislation this week that would ban the HIPAA -compliant transfer of de-identified data without individual consent.  SB 703 could have significant impacts on medical research, observational analyses and the development of genetic-based medicine. The bill was introduced at the request of Hu-manity.co, a company seeking profit from sale of its blockchain technology platform.

ACTION ALERT

OSCC asks for your assistance to shine a light on the negative impacts of cap-and-trade. Individual chambers can start by joining the  Partnership for Oregon Communities. The Partnership will coordinate grassroots voices with concerns about the rising costs of fuel and energy.  Email jessicac@oregonchamber.org to join the coalition. OSCC will follow up as we learn of opportunities for public testimony and engagement with the legislature.

The Mission of the BACC Legislative Action Team (LAT) is to serve as an advocate for Chamber members and the business community in local and state issues impacting quality of life, growth, and profitability of member businesses and their employees. Purpose is to increase the Chamber’s influence in the development of public policy concerning issues of critical importance to the future of the Bay Area and its businesses. Gets in on the action at the Oregon legislative sessions and helps shape local government decisions that will maintain a healthy business climate. Conducts candidate forums during election years.

Join the BACC LAT which meets the first and third Tuesday, 7 am for video teleconferences, conference room at SWOCC (5th floor, room 505 Tioga Hall).

Contact: Tom Burdett 541-756-7142 tom@bntpromo.com

Legislative Update: Feb. 4, 2019

The 2019 legislative session is starting its fourth week, and the BACC is pleased to share with you this weekly update from the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce:

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

Two major bills are moving quickly – rent control (SB 608) and the first Medicaid funding bill (HB 2010).

One other major bill is now in full swing – cap and trade (HB 2020).

Additionally, the legislative conversations are now underway on a major business tax to fund K-12 education.  This discussion is happening every Tuesday and Thursday evening in the Joint Student Success Committee (Revenue Subcommittee).  To date, the committee is looking at other state taxing models that utilize gross receipts – Washington, Nevada, Ohio, and others.  At this point, it looks most likely that the committee will recommend a gross receipts-based tax and not additional increases to the state’s corporate income tax.

Activity on Major Issues

We are expecting to see early activity this week on a handful of key policy and budget items that Democratic legislative leaders have identified as key priorities, including:

  • Medicaid Funding will likely pass Ways & Means this week (HB 2010).  This is the bill that will implement the first stages of Medicaid funding proposed by the Governor – the Hospital provider tax ($98 million) and the insurance tax ($410 million).  Local hospital systems will support this bill because it eliminates the true tax that was levied on hospitals in 2017-19.  However, the bill also increases taxes on commercial health insurance policies from 1.5% to 2%.  These taxes will be passed through directly to small business customers.
  • Rent Control will get a Senate vote this week (SB 608).  We expect this bill to pass the Senate as early as Tuesday.  SB 608 has two key features: (1) it limits rent increases to 7% plus CPI in all buildings over 15 years old, and (2) disallows no-cause evictions after one year.
  • Cap & Trade legislation is now in full swing (HB 2020). OSCC members got a major boost last week as NW Natural clearly articulated the huge cost increases on their natural gas customers if HB 2020 were to pass.  They gave legislators a handout that showed massive cost impacts to residential, small commercial, and industrial ratepayer.  The invited testimony on HB 2020 will continue on Monday this week. Public testimony kicks off on Friday afternoon at 1:00 PM and is scheduled again on February 18 at 5:00 PM.  OSCC participation will be needed as the public hearings go around the state in the coming weeks.
  • Single use straw ban (SB 90).  This issue seemed to stall as committee members pressed for exemptions from the ‘straw ban’ for convenience stores and drive throughs as well as a local preemption that would prohibit more stringent local regulations.  Environmental advocates oppose carve-outs and appear to now want to let cities and counties move forward with a patchwork of local regulations.  Although SB 90 appears stalled for now, we don’t believe we’ve seen the last of this issue in 2019.
  • Workplace marijuana accommodation (SB 379). In a touch of irony, the proponents for the workplace marijuana accommodation bill were late and almost missed the hearing.  OSCC submitted joint testimony with the general business community in opposition to this measure.  OSCC has an active ACTION ALERT on this issue.  Please contact your senator and ask them to say ‘no’ to SB 379.

Other Key Issues Coming up This Week

  • Small business tax cut repeal. (SB 211)  OSCC is disappointed, but not surprised, to see the Senate Finance & Revenue Committee taking up the issue of repealing Oregon’s lower tax rates for pass-through businesses.  Oregon’s ‘small business tax cut’ law currently imposes lower tax rates on the first $5 million of business income.  SB 211 would apply lower tax rates to only the first $415,000 of business income and then would completely repeal the ‘small business tax cut’ altogether starting in 2026.
  • Liabilities for Employment Discrimination. (SB 726)  Watch out for this bill.  This could be very similar to the wage equity bill of 2017 where it is politically impossible to oppose but will have far-reaching impacts on business. This bill started out as targeting sexual harassment, but has morphed into a general employment discrimination bill that creates a new 7-year statute of limitations and holds officers and principals personally liable for discrimination.  OSCC is monitoring this bill closely as there is lack of agreement on potential impacts.
  • Workplace Marijuana Accommodation.  (HB 2655) This is the House version of SB 379 that would make it an unlawful employment action to condition employment based on refraining from the off-duty use of cannabis.  While the bill contains an exception for jobs where the work cannot be performed while impaired, there is currently no easy test to determine if someone is impaired while at the workplace.  OSCC is opposing this legislation in the Senate because it is a direct affront on an employer’s ability to enforce a workplace drug-free policy.  A hearing is posted on the bill this Tuesday in the House Business and Labor Committee.  We do not expect the House to move its version.

ACTION ALERT

  • OSCC asks for your assistance to shine a light on the negative impacts of cap-and-trade!  Individual chambers can start by joining the Partnership for Oregon Communities.  The Partnership will coordinate grassroots voices with concerns about the rising costs of fuel and energy.  Email jessicac@oregonchamber.org to join the coalition.  OSCC will follow up as we learn of opportunities for public testimony and engagement with the legislature.

Committee Reports

Committee Reports

BACC LAT Board Quarterly Report –  4/29/19

What’s Happening (OSCC Political Observations)

Negotiations are underway on what a “go home” package of legislation would be for legislative Democrats who hold strong majorities in the legislature.

Legislative leadership appears to be signaling to the business community that they will pass:

  1. HB 3427, the $2 billion gross receipts tax on businesses with $1 million or more in sales. The details of the tax are still in discussion.
  2. An undefined PERS reform proposal.
  3. A paid family leave proposal that would require both employers and workers to pay new taxes.
  4. A buy down of PERS liabilities that would include about a $300 million contribution from SAIF.
  5. An amended version of Cap and Trade (HB 2020).

The one concession that leadership appears to be willing to make is to kill HB 2269, the employer health care tax. It is unclear at this point which policy bills will get wrapped up in the negotiation.

Activity on Major Issues

  • The $2 billion Commercial Activity Tax (HB 3427) is now clearly the top priority of legislative leadership. Although there was a serious effort to pass the bill out of committee on Thursday evening, the bill ultimately did not move.

Absent any real movement on negotiations with democrat leadership in the House and Senate, the bill is slated to move out of committee on Monday night.

As it stands, HB 3427 has the following components:

    • A gross receipts tax rate of 0.49% on Oregon sales over $1 million;
    • A 25% deduction from taxable sales for labor OR business inputs, whichever is higher;
    • An exemption for receipts from sales to a wholesaler or ag cooperative for any sales outside of Oregon; and
    • An exemption for groceries (defined as those that qualify for ‘SNAP’).
  • Cap-and-Trade (HB 2020). The Joint Committee on Carbon Reduction is scheduled to resume its work again this week with two meetings (Monday and Friday) to consider new amendments to HB 2020, the Cap-and-Trade bill. OSCC anticipates that amendments will be released Monday for consideration by the committee. We will keep you updated after we’ve had a chance to review changes in the amendments. The rumor is that there will be a serious attempt to pass HB 2020 out of committee right as early as next week (the week of May 6th).

What happened last week?

  • Employer Health Care Tax (HB 2269A). Last Monday, OSCC joined Oregon Business & Industry, Oregon Farm Bureau, and the Northwest Grocers in testifying in opposition to HB 2269A. This bill would require employers with 50 or more employees (who work at least 8 hours a week) to provide a minimum payment towards the employees’ health care or pay the state the difference. Although it’s not being called a “tax”, the Oregon Health Authority is projecting $0.50 per hour worked per employee and a total revenue generation of $500 million.
  • Sexual Harassment (SB 726A). SB 726A passed out of the Senate with a 23-6 vote. Individual liability for owners, officers and executives (who knew or should have known about the alleged harassment) remains out of the bill, but there are still concerns about the ability of small businesses to maintain records and data for the new 5-year statute of limitations to file harassment claims. Under the bill, employers are prohibited from using non-disclosure agreements as a means to settle harassment claims.
  • Pregnancy Accommodations (HB 2341A). HB 2341A moved out of the Senate Workforce Committee last week. As written, employers with 6+ employees must provide reasonable accommodations for pregnant employees, but any of those businesses may file an undue hardship exemption with BOLI. Easy final passage is expected on Senate floor.
  • Expressing Milk in the Workplace (HB 2593A). Under HB 2593A, all employers must provide reasonable rest periods for an employee to express milk during a child’s first 18 months. However, an employer with 10 or fewer employees may file an undue hardship exemption with BOLI. The next stop is the Senate floor for final passage.

Other key issues coming up this week.

The upcoming week is going to be fairly quiet on key issues. There will be no additional hearings on Cap and Trade this week, but there will be consideration of the following:

  • Prevailing wages in enterprise zones. HB 2408 requires prevailing wages on all private projects in Enterprise Zones in excess of $20 million. Such a policy erodes one of Oregon’s last remaining economic development tools. The bill easily passed the House and is already up for a public hearing in the Senate Workforce Committee on Tuesday. OSCC will issue an Action Alert on this critical economic development issue.
  • Workers’ compensation compromise. (HB 3022) OSCC initially testified against this legislation, which would have upended 30-years of successful workers’ compensation reforms and drastically raised workers’ comp costs on employers. However, the bill was deftly negotiated by SAIF so as to end up a compromise bill that won’t impact employer rates. The bill will see committee action in the House Rules Committee on Monday.

 

 

ACTION ALERT

OSCC will be issuing an Action Alert for HB 2408 this week. This bill, which will require prevailing wages in privately-funded Enterprise Zone projects of $20 million or more, would be a strong hindrance to much needed economic development projects. Enterprise Zones are one of Oregon’s last remaining viable economic development tools.

To review those specific Bills/Measures go to https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1 and type the SB or HB into the search box.

With Respect,

Tom – LAT Chair

Ambassador Report: 04/03/19

Everyone has been working hard on recruiting new ambassadors. At the last meeting we had 22 people.. which is huge! 5 new ambassadors with potential for more. We have one Ribbon Cutting scheduled for April 13th, 1 PM at Bahama Boards.  Our next Ambassador meeting will be on Thursday April 4th at Ciccarreli’s, noon. April’s B.A.H will be held at Painted Zebra Boutique, Thursday April 25th from 5p to 7p. Stacy and I would like to thank everyone for their support. It truly makes a difference when the team works together.

Leadership Coos Report: 04/03/19

The Leadership Coos Program has been moving right along this year (too quickly if you asked me!). In the
month of March, the agenda focused on Education in the Bay Area and received great reviews from
participants. We heard updates from Coos Bay and North Bend School District Superintendents, toured
Head Start, the Boys and Girls Club and the Charleston Marine Life Center. Lunch at the Oregon Institute
of Marine Biology was a big hit and we topped it off with a presentation at Southwestern Oregon
Community College.
The month of April will be our last topic of the year and focuses on Arts, Entertainment and Recreation in
the Bay Area. This is always a very enjoyable day that features great entertainment from the Oregon
Coast Lab Band, a tour of the Coos Art Museum and even dune buggy rides at Spinreel. We typically get
to take a ride from the Charleston Marina to the Coos Bay Boardwalk on the Betty Kay, but unfortunately,
business ownership recently changed hands and it’s just not going to work out this year. Thankfully, we
live in an area with no shortage of recreational activities, so our Committee has decided to incorporate a
Parks and Campground Tour along Cape Arago Highway. What a great way to showcase our beautiful
beaches and parks!
The Steering Committee is very busy planning graduation day at the Yacht Club on May 14, as well as the
Leadership Coos 30th Reunion Celebration scheduled for June 20. This is going to be a very fun event and
we hope to see lots of familiar faces there! BACC staff is preparing to send the invitations out and Pam
and Jolene are creating a shareable Facebook event. Please plan on joining us for some great stories,
delicious food and live music!
Respectfully Submitted,
Christy Wright
Committee Chair

Natural Resource Team Report:  2-4-19

  • The Natural Resources committee hold regular joint meetings with DTO the 3rd Friday of the month at 7 am and now has been moved from the Red Lion to The Mill Casino.
  • Recreational and Commercial Crabbing is open along entire Oregon Coast, Thursday, January 31, 2019

The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) announce recreational and commercial crabbing is now open for the entire Oregon Coast, free of restrictions. Crab samples taken from the area of Cape Blanco, north of Port Orford, to the California border indicate that levels of the marine biotoxin domoic acid have dropped below the closure limit.

For commercial crabbing, ODA and ODFW have lifted the requirement that all crab harvested from Cape Blanco to the California border be eviscerated (gutted). An evisceration requirement will remain in place for all crab harvested from any area outside of Oregon with crab viscera samples for domoic acid of 30 ppm or higher, which includes all crab harvested off California at this time.

It is always recommended that crab be eviscerated and the guts, or butter, discarded prior to cooking. When whole crab are cooked in liquid, domoic acid may leach into the cooking liquid. It is recommended to discard the cooking liquid, and do not use it in other dishes, such as sauces, broths, soups, roux, etc. The consumption of crab viscera is not recommended.

ODA and ODFW will continue monitoring marine biotoxins in crab and shellfish to ensure the concentrations remain below the closure limit.

  • Spring Bear application due Feb. 10 SW Oregon is now a controlled hunt like all other spring bear hunts.

Lumber prices have fallen since record highs in 2Q2018, mostly due to housing starts are simply overblown and there isn’t much room for an increase beyond the 2018 level.  Despite the one-two hurricane punch that recently impacted the US South and the continued wildfires in the Pacific Northwest, extreme weather events that have significantly impacted forest inventories, harvests and supply, the drop in lumber prices over the last six months is largely, though not entirely, demand driven.  Fewer new-home builds = less lumber

Hello Board of Directors,                                                                                                              1/28/2019

Here is the LAT Quarterly Report at present. The 2019 Legislative Session began 1/14.

As of present, these are the items that OSCC and we at LAT will be paying attention to. There is always more to arrive for review and action. We at LAT will be informing you with abundant material as the Session processes along. We are meeting 2/5 and 2/19 this month, 7am @ CBVIC meeting room.

Best,

Tom Burdett, LAT Chair

2019 Legislative Report – Week 1
Dear OSCC members and colleagues –

The 2019 legislative session is now underway in Oregon.

The 2019 Legislature has already introduced over 1,700 bills.  OSCC expects another 1,000+ pieces of legislation to be introduced over the next six weeks.  Of the 1,700 bills that have been introduced thus far, OSCC is keeping an eye on:

  • HB 2655 and SB 379 which would prevent employers from enforcing zero-tolerance workplace drug-free policies on marijuana;
  • SB 110 and HB 2175, which would help alleviate the complications that have arisen from Oregon’s new manufacturing overtime limits which cap production employees at 60 hours per week;
  • HB 2255 and SB 592, which would increase damage awards in medical lawsuits;
  • SB 608, a comprehensive rent control and tenant protection bill.
  • Dozens of bills that increase individual, business, property, or product excise taxes.

OSCC expects that several hundred new bills will be introduced this week.  We will continue to screen all new legislation for impact on our local business communities.

As with previous sessions, OSCC expects that the Senate will be the backstop on bad business bills.  Although Democrats have expanded their majority to 18-12 in the Senate, a handful of key moderate Democrats will still control the flow of bills that pass.  Senators Arnie Roblan (D-Coos Bay), Lee Beyer (D-Springfield), Betsy Johnson (D-Scappoose), Mark Hass (D-Beaverton), and Laurie Monnes Anderson (D-Gresham) will be the key bloc of Senators who will decide just how aggressive the legislature will be on issues of taxes and other progressive policies that will impact business.

Early Activity on Major Issues

We are expecting to see early activity on a handful of key policy and budget items that Democratic legislative leaders have identified as key priorities, including:

  • Rent control.  Senate Bill 608 will limit rent increases to 7% per year in buildings over 15 years old and also prohibits no cause evictions for tenants after one year of tenancy.  This is a key priority for Democratic leadership that will start receiving public hearings on February 4th.
  • Cap & Trade.  We are expecting to see the 2019 cap & trade bill for the first time by the end of this week.  It will likely start receiving public hearings the week of February 4th.
  • Business taxes.  Starting this Tuesday, the Joint Student Success Committee will initiate its Revenue Subcommittee hearings on a potential tax plan that will meet the Governor’s objective of raising business taxes by $2 billion for K-12, Pre-K, and higher education.

                                      Other Issues Coming up This Week

  • Single use straw ban.  Senate Bill 90 would ban the use of single use straws.  It will be heard in the Senate Environment & Natural Resources Committee on Tuesday.
  • Workplace accommodations for pregnant employees.  House Bill 2341 could require an employer to hire an additional person to do heavy lifting or to purchase equipment to allow an employee to stay in their job during the pregnancy.  The bill is scheduled for a hearing in House Business & Labor on Monday morning.  A similar policy has been adopted in Washington, but some business sectors have had issues with implementation.
  • Biometric data collection.  SB 284 would make it an unlawful employment practice to collect biometric data (e.g. fingerprints, retinol scans, etc.) from employees.  There are still unanswered questions about the scope of the bill, which will be heard on Thursday in the Senate Workforce Committee.

You can investigate the Bills at https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1 then look for the BILLS tab in the upper right corner. Click it and then you are able to search House and Senate Bills. Any concerns, contact me.   J   541-404-1028 / thomascburdett@gmail.com  .

Marketing & Membership – Board Update

  • Continued execution of Chamber Benefit Marketing Plan. Promoting one of the reasons to join the chamber per month from the 10 reasons to join wheel.
    • January – “#1 The Chamber Brings Credibility to my Business”
      • Posted on Facebook with related commentary
      • Posted on the Website
      • Timm to discuss in one Chamber Minute on the radio and in the newspaper
      • Table Tents at WBC
      • Looking at other ways to Market Chamber Benefits including testimonials and other ways to tell our story
      • Looking at the 3C Chamber Concept: Catalyst for business growth, Convener for leaders and influencers, Champion for stronger communities
      • Develop Talking Points for Directors, Committees and Volunteers to use when promoting the Chamber and seeking new membership
        • Initial list developed; interviewed board at January work session; Interviewing 2018 New Chamber Members
      • Develop a Prospect List & tracking form – Market Prospects – Goal to grow to 600 Members by 2020 (current membership 534)
        • Obtained names from SBDC of businesses in our area
        • To sort the list and form a prospect list
        • Train volunteers to call on prospects
        • Prospect outreach planned to include face to face calls, Executive Director contact and President contact
      • New Member Mentoring
      • Tracking sheet for new members – planed outreach over the 1st year of membership to help them connect. Planned visits, direct correspondence, Executive Director contact and President contact
      • Exiting Member Checklist
      • Checklist to interview exiting Chamber members to see how we can improve on our service.
      • Social Media
      • Looking for ways to enhance and expand our Social Media presence including the introduction of short videos.

Leadership Coos 2018/19

Quarterly Report

Happy New Year!

The Leadership Coos program is nearly halfway through the year, completing our fourth session with Health & Human Services in December. Class participation has been great and the participants are very engaged – even when we cover tough topics, such as child abuse in Coos County. The next session is called “How We Are Governed” and is scheduled for January 8. The day will include a tour of the Coos County Courthouse and an overview of State Courts with Judge Martin Stone.

The Steering Committee is busy planning the 30 Year Reunion, which is scheduled for June 20, 2019 from 3:00 pm to 7:00 pm at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology. The theme for the event is “Pearls of Wisdom”. There will be great food, music and lots of fun stories. Please mark your calendars and join us! Invitations will be sent via email very soon.

Respectfully Submitted,

Christy Wright

Committee Chair

Our meeting this month will be held at the Rodeo Steak house at noon, Thursday Jan 10th.

We have 1 ribbon cutting so far in January.

United Ways new location

Wednesday Jan 16th

186 N. 8th st (CB) open house from 4p till 7p with ribbon cutting at 5p.

We are still in need for some BAH slots to be filled,

Thursday Jan 31st

Thursday Feb 28th

Thursday March 28th

Thursday May 30th

Thursday July 25th

Please contact Lonni or Stacy if you have any question or would like to host a BAH.

Lonni (541)297-8179

Stacy (541)252-9655

The education committee met during the fall term and had a robust discussion about Southwestern’s new Hospitality and Tourism Program. The SWOCC faculty received very useful feedback.

The Junior Chamber is planning their annual Teddy Bear Toss Benefiting the Kids Hope Center on Saturday March 2nd.

The education committee has identified the recipients the Educator of The Year Award.

The next meeting is Monday January 14 at SWOCC in the “Black Box”. Jessica is stepping down as The Education Committee Chair.

Jan 14 will be her last meeting.

Events Committee December 2018 Report

Meets the Second Monday, Noon @ Nasburg Huggins Insurance

The Events Committee serves the Chamber by creating additonal revenue, creating networking opportunities for our members, and bringing local businesses together. We are always open to ideas and suggestions on improving existing events, creating new events, or parterning with others to bring more to our Chamber.

The following is a list of upcoming events. Our next focus is the Directory Distribution and providing a prominient showing of the Chambers numbers as we deliver the new directory to our members. We will be asking Board members for participation in this event so please plan to participate.

  1. February 28. 2019 – Directory Distribution and Picnic at the Museum 
  2. August – Taking Care of Business Bowling Event
  3. September – Golf Tournament

Welcome Chamber Members

Your Chamber Transportation committee members over the recent months has been involved in the Coos Bay/North Bend TSP (Transportation Systems Plan) as volunteer, PAC (Public Action Committee) members.

The Cities most recent Transportation System Plans were developed in 2004. Five years remain of the current TSP’s 2023 planning horizon but recent developments and plans necessitate an update. The Cities must update their TSP to maintain a 20-year planning horizon and comply with the Transportation Planning Rule (TPR).

Study Area

The Project includes two distinct areas, the City of North Bend and the City of Coos Bay. The cities are located in Coos County, Oregon on the Pacific Ocean. The City of North Bend is surrounded on three sides by Coos Bay, sharing its southern border with the City of Coos Bay, which is near where the Coos River enters Coos Bay. Together, they are referred to as one entity called either Coos Bay/North Bend, or the Bay Area. The study area is the boundary for the Project, which includes, at a minimum, City Limits, Urban Growth Boundary (“UGB”) and urban reserves.

A TSP examines the City’s multimodal transportation system as a whole, considers planning for street maintenance, connectivity, access, safety and the impact of future growth throughout the network. In order to review the system that is most likely to affect an average Bay Area citizen or visitor, and to efficiently use time and resources for analysis, TSPs generally focus on the higher-order, arterial and collector street system. Arterials and collectors, by definition, provide connections across a city and between neighborhoods and activity centers. As such, the arterial and collector street intersections and corridors are the focus of the TSP Update.

There has been progress made on the Transportation System Plan update and are ready for a PAC meeting and a public open house to discuss.  We are looking to share the current information at an open house on December 12th, at the North Bend Library from 5 – 7 p.m.

SWACT Members

Did you know that most participating members of the Chamber Transportation Committee are also SWACT Members, either currently or formerly (Southwest Area Commission on Transportation)? They include; Rick Skinner (Vice Chair), Ron Kutch, Art Poole, Martin Callery (now a member of the OTC, appointed by the Governor), Jim Hossley, Randy Dixon, John Sweet, John Rowe, Jennifer Groth, Mark Usselman.

The membership is currently working on how to become more assertive with ODOT, as a it has to do with its area management and infrastructure needs with HB 2017 spending.

If you would like to join us, you can contact the Chamber office or just join us; we meet the second Tuesday of each month, at the Coos Bay Visitor Information Center, conference room, from noon – 1 p.m.

Chamber Tourism Committee Quarterly Report

Member of the Chamber’s Tourism Committee met on September 27, 2018 to discuss the future of the committee and its goals for 2019. During the course of the meeting it was determined that the group would meet quarterly, except during the months immediately preceding our largest event of the year, Travel & Tourism Week events, including the Bay Area Brigade.

Location and time of the meeting will change in 2019. The meeting will remain the third Thursday of the months in which we hold meetings but will now be held in the Conference Room of the Coos Bay Visitor Information Center at 8:00am. The next meeting of the Chamber Tourism Committee will be Thursday, January 17th.

One of our primary goals for 2019 is increasing communication within the community about the importance of tourism to the Bay Area. As this goal dovetails with a goal of the Coos Bay-North Bend Visitor & Convention Bureau, a joint monthly newsletter began going out to Chamber members and others in the community focusing on important news and activities happening in tourism in the area. The plan is to send this newsletter via email the first week of each month. If you are not currently receiving this newsletter, you can sign up at https://oregonsadventurecoast.com/industry-news/.

Other Tourism Committee Goals include:

  • Fully Plan and Promote Travel & Tourism Week, May 5-11, 2019 
    • Make a Bigger Splash, with more events including the Bay Area Brigade. 
    • Suggestions included a Street Party with the BBQ post Brigade being open to those who participate and those who do not; invite local attractions/organizations to have tables/booths at street party; invite the Surfrider Foundation to do demonstrations or activities on the Boardwalk; appreciation lunches for Fire and Police in both cities. 
    • Widespread media coverage/promotion 
  • Regional Tourism
    • Work closely with the Regional tourism groups that have been forming – Travel Southern Oregon Coast, the Oregon South Coast Regional Tourism Network, and the Oregon Coast Visitors Association – to help promote the area to keep visitors here longer.
  • Communications
    • (As noted above) Along with the VCB, create an Industry Newsletter to send updated information, news and other data to industry professionals and interested citizens in the area. This newsletter would allow the committee to promote such activities as the Ambassador program and the activities for Travel & Tourism Week.
    • Increase community communications with Monthly Articles in The World from a variety of committee/Chamber members – on topics that highlight the importance of tourism to our economy.
  • Ensure front line staff at local businesses can answers the question “What is there to do here?”
    • Host FAM tours for local frontline workers – 1/2 day mini-tours of our attractions to help our frontline staff help our visitors find great things to see & do, for a minimal fee.
    • Renewed push for the Community Ambassador Program – as a committee, encourage businesses to have their staff go through the online program. It is easier to access now.
    • Help distribute new collateral from the VCB to local businesses.

The last few month have been a mixture of County government, Candidate forums, the Oregon business plan, SBDC and an update on the Jordan Cove Energy Project, which was attended by almost 80 folks.

There will be two WBC programs in December, leading into our Christmas and New Year’s hiatus. The first WBC program of the new year, will be on January 9th with Carmen and Annie, of 7 Devils Brewery, chatting about their Drinking Civilly program and more.

Currently we are scheduling the 2019 portion of our season, from January through May. If you have a topic, issue or business you would like to hear more about, please give me a call or note.

Timm Slater

WBC Chair

 

 

Chamber Minutes

A weekly update from our Executive Director, Timm Slater…

The Chamber Minute 05/04/19

Isn’t it amazing how quickly time passes and what is important to community life changes? Do you remember Vollsted Volkswagen or the Emporium or the Hub in downtown Coos Bay? Change, that is directed with vision, can chart a course to a great future. Let’s continue to focus on those BOLD ideas!

In a study about nations, it was asked, is a nation’s positive image of its future a function of its success or is its success a function of its positive image of its future? What they found was, in all cases, significant vision preceded significant success. Many nations began their climb to greatness without the right resources, population base or strategic advantages. What they did have was a detailed, extensive and significant vision of what they could become. This is also true about communities, businesses and even you. So, how about helping detail our vision for Oregon’s Bay Area.

What are the most noticeable differences you would like to see here in 2029? What would be different? How will the population mix differ from what it is now? What lifestyle changes have taken place? How will these differences affect your city? How will local government be different? What would it be like to live here? What would be the same?

I’m asking each of you to take some time, put some thought into it and detail your 2029 vision for our home. Use some of your BOLD ideas in the plan. This is an open book test, so get as much help from your family and friends as you want. Please share your thoughts with me at the Chamber office prior to May 31st. I’ll compile that response and get it out to all of you. Your ideas are critical to our success. This is really the first step in creating our own future. So, like the old hymn, we can “brighten the corner where you are”.

Remember our business is helping your business and like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 04/27/19

Recently Portland State University came out with its population projections for the next 25 years for all communities in Oregon. For Coos County they predict 25 years of no growth. Having suffered with over 30 years of no growth, I’m not inclined to accept that future and I hope you are not either. It is truly time for a new path.

The people of Manitoba felt the same concern about 9 years ago and found no solace in their elected leaders and their game plan. Hence arose, from the people, Manitoba BOLD and more.

So, what is your BOLD idea for Oregon’s Bay Area and Coos County?

BOLD is a community defining its vision, mission and values and collaborating with civic officials and leaders throughout the community to come together for the success of Coos County. Our community has survived because of the passion of the people that live here.  Where would this area be without the John Whitty’s, the Louie Simpson’s, the Gordon Ross’s or dozens of others throughout our history.  Where would this county be without all of you? You are all leaders in some way.  Everyone in this community plays a role in its successful future.  It’s our time to come together with a common vision for, and a common voice defining, what our home is and will be.  It is time that we took the reins and define who we are, what we want to be and what is good for us and our children. Now that’s a BOLD idea!

We know every business venture starts with a vision. So, I’m here to ask you, WHAT IS YOUR BOLD IDEA for Oregon’s Bay Area and Coos County? Let’s make that difference now!

Remember Our Business is helping your Business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 04/20/19

Top 10 reasons to join the Chamber: Number 4,
Gain a voice in government.

Country singer Aaron Tippin had a song a few years ago entitled, “You got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything”. Our Legislative Action Team (LAT) takes that to heart. It’s important for your Chamber to promote those things which give us a positive economic climate to grow your business and create a healthy community for your family.
The LAT has actively participated in every legislative session since 2011. In the 2018 short session, they tracked and worked the bills in support of the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce (OSCC) Legislative Agenda. While we have not been successful in every fight, the Chambers of Commerce in Oregon, are having an impact in Salem.  The LAT, over the past few years, has developed a strong relationship with our legislators through the OSCC Chamber Day at the capitol, twice monthly teleconferences with them which we sponsor with the college, and direct contact with their offices. During the session, our Team meets as many times as necessary, each month, to be timely and effective. The 2019 session at the legislature is filled with challenges for Oregon businesses and communities which the LAT is striving to balance for all of us. Beyond the legislature, your LAT is actively participating in many other local issues, to make a difference for you.
Too often we think if we had more time, assets or help, we could really get something done. I am reminded of an old hymn which says “To the many duties ever near you now be true. Brighten the corner where you are”. So Chamber member, if you want to have an impact give us a call and join the LAT.
Remember our business is helping your business”. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 04/13/19

Did you know that Coos County is Oregon’s leading producer of cranberries? Were you aware of the many opportunities for good live theater and music productions in our area? Have you ever wondered what a city councilor ready does? The answers to these and many other questions can be found in the Chamber’s Leadership Coos program.

Leadership Coos is an excellent way to see the total picture of what this area is about. Whether you have lived here all your life or just arrived in Oregon’s Bay Area, in the nine months of Leadership Coos you will learn facts, find services and discover opportunities you never knew existed.  You also share time with a diverse group of professionals who make up your class, those giving presentations and the Leadership Coos committee members who were always on hand to direct the process.

One day per month from September through May participants attend seminars, tours and briefings which show them the issues and opportunities within our community and challenge them to become involved in the political or community organizations that match their interest. Monthly subjects, for example, range from Natural Resources & Agriculture, the historic foundation of our economy, to How we are Governed, from the city to the federal level, to Living in the Bay Area—talking about arts, entertainment and recreation, and many more topic areas.

Leadership Coos graduates its 30th class next month and is looking ahead to forming the 2019-2020 class. So, if this sounds interesting to you, give us a call today and we will get you on the list. Also, all you Leadership Coos Alumni, we will be having a 30th anniversary celebration on June 20th at OIMB. Look for more information soon.

Remember our business is helping your business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 04/06/19

It’s Spring! Isn’t it great to go to work and come home in the daylight? All over the small green leaves are budding out and the daffodils are sprouting by the road side. Our thoughts turn to yard work, barbecues and getting ready for visitors.

National Tourism week is May 5 through May 11. Since we have company coming, a Bay Area Brigade has been organized to clean up Highway 101 on Saturday April 27th from 8:30 am to 11:30 am. We have the highway broken into areas to be covered by Pirates, Bulldogs or Lakers. When your three-hour shift is done, everyone will head for the CB Fire Hall for a free BBQ Lunch and to find out which team will receive the Bay Area Brigade Trash Trophy for most stuff collected. If you don’t have a team and still want to help, come on down to the starting point on Saturday and we will match you up with a team to help make Oregon’s Bay Area sparkle!

At 7:30 am, Saturday April 27th, we will all gather at the NB Fire Station. At the registration site, besides signing your waivers, there will be 101 section maps, garbage bags, trash pickers vests and gloves available from ODOT and SOLVE. At the end of the event ODOT will collect all the trash bags.

If you think your business isn’t a tourist related, think again. In 2017, for example, Coos County visitors spent $25 million on ground transportation and motor fuel. They spent over $29 million in retail stores and another $25 million in grocery stores. . In total, visitors spent some $271 million in Coos County.

So hey let’s all get out and spruce up the Highway. Company is coming!

Remember Our Business is helping your Business, and like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 03/30/19

Did you know that the first Community college in Oregon was our own Southwestern Oregon community College? It was formed through an election in May 1961, by local people seeing a need for higher education on the south coast. In the first few years Southwestern held classes in surplus US Navy WWII facilities. Construction of the permanent campus, around Empire Lakes, began in 1963, with additions in the 1970s and the 90s. Later the Oregon Coast Culinary Institute, was added. The progress continued with the construction and opening of the Curry county campus in 2012.

Enrollment has grown from 815 in 1961 to over 10,000 students annually.

Cultural and athletic events at the college attract hundreds from the community to the campus each year. As a partner in the South Coast’s economic development, Southwestern offers the region’s employees and employers educational opportunities to meet their needs.

In the last couple years, the forestry program returned to Southwestern with classes for a new Associate of Science (AS) degree. Also, the College signed an agreement with OSU which enables AS degree holders to transfer into OSU as juniors.  Now Southwestern is actively moving ahead with construction plans for the new Health & Science building to provide students the most current technologies. A groundbreaking ceremony will take place on April 12th.

So where ever you want to go in life, you truly can get there through Southwestern Oregon Community College.

This is Timm Slater for the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce, remember our business is helping your business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 03/23/19

It’s almost Spring! Isn’t it great to go to work and come home in the daylight? All over the small green leaves are budding out, grass is growing and rhododendrons are blooming. Our thoughts turn to baseball, graduations and getting ready for visitors.

If you think your business isn’t a tourist related business, think again. In 2017 Coos County visitors spent $25 million on ground transportation and motor fuel. They spent over $29 million in retail stores and another $25 million in grocery stores. In total, visitors spent some $271 million in Coos County and guess what, it’s your employees that keep them coming back.

Remember when a person who had one bad experience used to tell 10 other people about it?  Ten years ago, Travel Oregon estimated that each bad experience cost a community $20,000. With Facebook, Twitter and other social media tools, imagine what that costs equates to today.

Now imagine what great experiences can do for your business. Visitors spend more and stay longer if they feel welcome. Why consumers will pay 10% more for a product or service from businesses that offers great customer service. To replace an existing customer, your businesses will spend five times more to attract a new one.

So, what can we do to get ready for this year’s guests? Focus on customer service, visitor appreciation and area knowledge with your staff. Sign up for the free online training for your frontline folks and help them become community Ambassadors! Register now at tourism.oregonstate.edu/camb/. It only takes a little time invested to make a big difference for our community and your business.

Remember Our Business is helping your Business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 03/16/19

When I entered the work “initiative” into my computer, I got a definition. When I typed “finishiative” into it, I’m told it isn’t a word. But it should be. The two words are defined as follows, initiative: the first step, the act of setting a process in motion, the ability or willingness to take the lead. Finishiative: the last step, the act of completing, the willingness to take a project or mission to its logical conclusion in optimum time. Both of these are essential to character, to growth and success in an individual, and for successful community development. Too often, folks aimlessly wander through life and end up with a load of guilt and regrets because of the many things they wanted to do but never got around to start. Others wind up with the same guilt and regrets because they had dreams, with some initiative, started many projects but never finished most of what they began.

This community can grow if our leaders will genuinely take the lead, exercise wisdom and initiative in getting work underway; if citizens involve themselves willingly to accomplish it and if all will focus on finishiative. While there are many ways to promote your community, let me suggest you look at your Chamber. Are you interested in economic development, education, tourism, developing leaders, promoting local business or improving transportation to Oregon’s Bay Area? Your Chamber has people, your friends and neighbors, working on these and more. So grab the issue important to you and come on down and join us. In the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce, we are all willing to “Step UP” and make a difference.

The Bay Area Chamber of Commerce, remember our business is helping your business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 03/09/19

Top 10 reasons to join the Chamber: Number 3, Create networking opportunities.

As a business person one of the most important things you do is to get the word out about what you produce, its excellent value, your great staff and where you can be found. In today’s world they call that networking. Here are just a few of the great networking opportunities your Chamber provides.

Business after Hours takes place the last Thursday of each month from 5 to 7 pm. It’s an opportunity for you to showcase your business, your staff and your products using an open house format with food and drink. Our Ambassadors welcome your guests. There’s a short formal presentation, supplemented with tours of your operations by your staff. With turn outs which range from 40 to over 100, what a great way to connect your business to the community.

The Wednesday Business Connection is held every Wednesday from September through May at the Mill Casino. Each week has a sponsor which is featured in all the event advertising during that week. The sponsor also gives a short Business Spotlight about their operations.  Generally, before the featured speaker we have an open mic enabling you to announce special sales, products new staff members or events. Lastly, we end the session each week with the drawing of business cards to door prizes provided by member businesses who are recognized for the contribution.

How about our events for networking, like the Economic Outlook Forum, the Annual Chamber Awards Banquet, the Highway 101 Clean Up Brigade, the Bowling Party or the Golf tournament?

Why not get serious about networking? Come take advantage of your Chamber opportunities.

The Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. Remember our business is helping your business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 03/02/19

With March we welcome in the beginning of Spring, tons of daffodils and more visitors showing up on the South Coast. Already this month you hosted the 3A Basketball State Championships at Marshfield and North Bend high schools. So what’s next?

Coming up March 8, 9 & 10 is the 30th annual South Coast Clambake Music festival at the Mill Casino-Hotel. Listen and dance to the likes of Barn Door Slammers, Bay City Swing, The Young Bucs, Gator Nation and more. See the festival website, clambakejazz.com, for information about the event and how to get tickets.

How about a little walking, talking and sipping with your friends, old and new? March 15th, from 5 to 7 pm is the quarterly Sip & Stroll in downtown North Bend. With program and wine or beer glass in hand, guests will stroll from location to location in the charming downtown sampling wine or beer, with all the money raised will benefit a pinning ceremony for the Southwestern Oregon Community College nursing class of 2019. The event starts at Engles Furniture at 5 pm. Why don’t you check out the local restaurants for their specials and make a night of it.

Now is also the time to get ready for that mass of summer visitors we can expect. Saturday March 23rd, SOLV sponsors its spring time Great Ocean Beach Cleanup from 10 am to 1 pm, on many of our local beaches. Over the past decade, SOLV volunteers have kept more than 4,000 tons of debris from entering Oregon waterways and the Pacific Ocean. So, shake off those soggy winter memories and let’s get ready for company along our beautiful coast!

Remember Our Business is helping your Business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute 02/23/19

Country singer Aaron Tippin had a song a several years ago entitled, “You got to stand for something or you’ll fall for anything”. Our Legislative Action Team (LAT) takes that to heart. It’s important for your Chamber to promote those things which give us a positive economic climate to grow your business and create a healthy community for your family.

The LAT has actively participated in every legislative session since 2011. In the 2018 short session, they tracked and worked the bills in support of the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce (OSCC) Legislative Agenda. While we have not been successful in every fight, the Chambers of Commerce in Oregon, are having an impact in Salem.  The LAT, over the past few years, has developed a strong relationship with our legislators through the OSCC Chamber Day at the capitol, twice monthly teleconferences with them which we sponsor with the college, and direct contact with their offices. During the session, our Team meets as many times as necessary, each month, to be timely and effective. The 2019 long session at the legislature has already been filled with challenges for Oregon businesses and communities which the LAT, joining with other Oregon Chambers, has worked to try to resolve favorably for you.   Additionally, your LAT is actively participating in many other local issues, to make a difference for you.

Too often we think if we had more time, assets or help, we could really get something done. I am reminded of an old hymn which says “To the many duties ever near you now be true. Brighten the corner where you are”. So, Chamber member if you want to have an impact give us a call and join the LAT.

Remember “our business is helping your business”. And like us on Facebook

The Chamber Minute. 02/16/19

Customer service is key to the vitality of our community. Businesses strive every day to not only meet, but exceed their customer’s needs. Have you had an outstanding customer service experience at a local store or restaurant that made you want to tell everyone about it? It’s that kind of service the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce honors each quarter with its 5 Star Customer Service Awards. The nominations will be evaluated by the Chamber’s Executive committee. Quarterly awards will be given at our weekly Wednesday Business Connection luncheon. A yearly award for outstanding customer service will be chosen from the year’s winners and given at the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Awards Banquet. There is no guarantee, however, that there will be an award for each quarter without your nominations.

Selection criteria include, but are not limited to:

  1. A commitment to customer service. A consistent commitment to customer service. With demonstrable pride in, and ownership of, that organizational culture by all employees.
  2. Customer follow up and product satisfaction. The organization should consistently request and listen to feedback from its customers. With that information they strive to improve their service and the experience for the customer.
  3. Additional Insights. There is always a prompt response to customer requests and keeping to agreed-upon timelines, combined with consistent delivery and quality. Information is always available by all appropriate channels for customers, by understanding how they want to receive that material and providing it. Other key areas of consideration can include: professionalism, knowledge, dependability, attentiveness and innovation.

 

Nomination forms can be found on the Chamber website, oregonsbayarea.org , or stop by the BACC office in Coos Bay. They are simple to fill out, being only a single page.  So, thank you for taking the time to help recognize and celebrate great businesses in our area.

Remember our business is helping your business and like us on Facebook.

 

The Chamber Minute 02/09/19

Top 10 reasons to join the Chamber: Number 2, Increase your visibility in the community.

As a business person one of the most important things you do is to get the word out about what you produce, its excellent value, your great staff and where you can be found. In today’s world they call that being visible.

As a member, your contact information is in our annual business directory. We produce 5,000 copies each year which are well distributed locally and regionally. Additionally, you are listed on our website, available to those who are seeking your products or services. We also regularly post your announcements to our Facebook page.

Why not be the focus of an evening by holding a Business after Hours at your operation, with two hours to acquaint everyone with what makes you special? Also, our Wednesday Business Connection luncheon gives you many opportunities to promote yourself. Whether it’s the open mic you can use to introduce new staff or products, door prizes provided for drawings at the end of the session or giving a business spotlight.

Visibility comes through sponsorships too. Sponsorships are highlighted in all our activity advertising. Weekly sponsorships are available for WBC. The Economic Outlook forum has numerous spots available, as does our BACC Awards banquet in January. Or maybe you would like to be a participant, bringing your team to our bowling party or golf tourney or the Highway 101 clean up.

How about becoming active in one of our committees like Tourism, Education or Business Development? Not only are you visible in the community, but you are making it a better place to live.

So, come on down and join the team today, for a better tomorrow.

Remember our business is helping your business, and like us on Facebook.

Chamber Minute-02/02/19

Wow, did we have a great evening this past Saturday with the Bay Area Chamber Awards Banquet—Step UP! Wonderful food, unique entertainment featuring a return of the Chamber Pots, and a variety of awards and recognitions which truly make this a community celebration.

Citizen of the year is an honor given to a member of our community who, by consistently giving of their time, energy and resources, has made Oregon’s Bay Area a better place to live. For 2018 that award was given to Jennifer Groth. Besides serving 8 years on the Coos Bay City Council, she actively stepped in many other tough issues important to the community, which included the gas tax increase proposal, the Community Enhancement Plan and county wide tourism. Jennifer has made volunteer service a way of life.

The Business of the Year award is given to a business that has exhibited excellence in products and customer service; contributed time, manpower and resources to community improvement projects; and excelled in employee relations and training. The 2018 award went to 7 Devils Brewing Company, honoring their excellence in business and strong commitment to the community.

Chamber Member of the Year is given to that member, who through their efforts, has carried us to a new level of community service and impact. In 2018 This honor went to Deena Gisholt. She has been a red coated Ambassador, on the Leadership Coos steering committee, an active Membership team organizer, part of the Chamber Board of Directors and an officer for several years. A strong supporter of the Chamber, Deena also encourages her staff to be involved.

Additionally, Nicole Ault, a first-grade teacher at Blossom Gulch Elementary School, was recognized as Educator of the Year. The City Councils of Coos Bay and North Bend received the Community Award as a dedicated group of volunteers doing difficult and sometimes thankless work to keep local government on track for their citizens.

What a great evening! See you at next year’s Banquet on the last Saturday of January.

Remember, our business is helping your business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute. 1/26/19

For the past several months we have talked about the various teams, activities and opportunities the Chamber is involved in. But why be a Chamber member? Periodically, I ask that question of our directors, who are your friends and neighbors. Here’s a little of what they had to say

  • I am active with the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce because I feel strongly that the business community supports one another and works to encourage the growth of our region.  We must get back on a sustainable foundation where we are better able to provide for ourselves.
  • I belong to the Chamber because I like the forward movement I am seeing.  We have moved from a quaint networking group to building a business advocacy powerhouse.  I feel we are making a difference in our area.  Our voice is being heard and we are actively representing our 550 members. We are building connections with key people and businesses to help move this area forward.  We are doing this all while we continue to build our membership providing those key networking opportunities that strengthen our team.
  • I am a chamber member because: 1) I like to stay connected to my peers and important community issues. It makes me feel like I have a voice and can help not only my community, but also my own business. 2) I appreciate the networking and reciprocity that occurs between chamber members. 3) I enjoy participating in community events (social outlet). Being involved allows me to be aware of all the events and participate as I am able.
  • I believe that as a business owner, I have a responsibility to invest my time and money back into the community that supports me and my family. As the community flourishes, so will my business.
  • It is simple.  We are stronger, have more influence and clout when we work together.  We will each be successful when we are all successful.

So, if you want to make a difference for your business and your community, join us today.

Remember our business is helping your business. And like us on Facebook.

The Chamber Minute. 01/19/19

A momentous movie, to some of my generation, was Smokey and the Bandit. It introduced us to the Pontiac Trans Am. For over 25 years following that movie, I  collected articles, pictures and books on the TA. I watched its styles and horsepower change. Finally, I found a late model in perfect shape, low miles and a great price. To everyone’s surprise, I brought it.  At long last, a dream realized.

Over the years, your Chamber has been the source of many dreams realized. The Tourism committee began with a focus to extend the seasons people come to visit us. They also believed tourism could become a significant part of our local economy. Their success has proved them right. Leadership Coos was formed to educate community members to the many facets of our area. It also had a goal to help produce the next set of community leaders. Today you find its graduates leading local business, government and agencies. The Wednesday Business Connection Team (WBC) stages a weekly business or community related forum, which draws over 45 participants each week, from September through May. This provides folks networking opportunities, current issue information and political insights. Besides regularly updating the program offerings to be timely and important for you, last year the team redesigned the sponsorship opportunity from monthly to weekly to enable more businesses to have the chance to promote their operations.

So, who will be the next “Wednesday Business Connection”, the new dream realized, of this Chamber year? Our community has many needs and opportunities that you, as a chamber member, can make happen. Come on down and we will find the Team for you.

Remember our business is helping your Business. And like us on facebook.

Top Ten Reasons to Join

Reason #1 to join ….
MEMBERSHIP BRINGS CREDIBILITY….

Gain Credibility Within Your Community
Joining your local Chamber can be a huge credibility booster. In fact, Chamber membership can boost your business’ reputation by 57%.

Consumers often use their Chamber as a resource when seeking out local goods and services. As more and more community members and consumers perceive your business as reliable, you’ll increase your potential for more referrals and new business deals.

Your Chamber of Commerce supports you as you experience this growing positive perception of your business.

 

Joining your local chamber can positively affect other organizations’ perceptions of your business, and also the views of consumers. Statistics show that 63% of consumers are more likely to purchase from a business that is a chamber of commerce member, and 44% are likely to view those businesses more favorably (Source: American Business Magazine). Plus, some businesses also give discounts for chamber members, a great advantage for small or new entrepreneurs. The reliability and trust your company gains through chamber of commerce membership will boost perception of your brand as an industry leader, and possibly give you the potential to increase revenue.

Reason #2 to join…
INCREASE YOUR VISIBILITY IN THE COMMUNITY. 

As a business person one of the most important things you do is to get the word out about what you produce, its excellent value, your great staff and where you can be found. In today’s world they call that being visible.

As a member, your contact information is in our annual business directory. We produce 5,000 copies each year which are well distributed locally and regionally. Additionally, you are listed on our website, available to those who are seeking your products or services. We also regularly post your announcements to our Facebook page.

Why not be the focus of an evening by holding a Business after Hours at your operation, with two hours to acquaint everyone with what makes you special? Also, our Wednesday Business Connection luncheon gives you many opportunities to promote yourself. Whether it’s the open mic you can use to introduce new staff or products, door prizes provided for drawings at the end of the session or giving a business spotlight.

Visibility comes through sponsorships, too. Sponsorships are highlighted in all our activity advertising. Weekly sponsorships are available for WBC. The Economic Outlook Forum has numerous spots available, as does our BACC awards banquet in January. Or maybe you would like to be a participant, bringing your team to our bowling party or golf tourney or the Highway 101 cleanup.

How about becoming active in one of our committees like tourism, education or business development? Not only are you visible in the community, but you are making it a better place to live.

So, come on down and join the team today, for a better tomorrow.

Remember our business is helping your business, and like us on Facebook.

Timm Slater is executive director of the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. For more information on your Chamber, email us at timmslater@oregonsbayarea.org.

  • WBC-the Wednesday Business Connection-Weekly networking/Business Luncheon, held Every Wednesday (September-May), Noon at the Mill Casino in the West Salmon Room.  Different Speakers with new topics each week.  Provides many opportunities….Sponsor (Call for exposure details) Attend (Open mic-30 seconds to tell us about your business) Bring a Give-Away to receive a shout-out (Door Prizes)
  • Show off your Business-Host a Business after Hours Event (The Last Thursday of the Month at different locations. Opportunity to Invite members to your business from 5-7 PM to host after hours events-Call to Schedule )~Open House (Much like Business after Hours only can schedule any day/time of the week)~
    Ribbon Cuttings(Celebrate your success with our Ambassadors-Many exposure opportunities

Reason #4 Gain a Voice in Government

  • THE CHAMBERS LEGISLATIVE ACTION TEAM MEETS WITH LEGISLATORS TWICE A MONTH DURING SESSION. THEY ASK THE TOUGH QUESTIONS ABOUT PROPOSED LEGISLATION AND ADVOCATE FOR POSITIVE CHANGE.

Join the BACC Legislative Action Team Committee on the first and third Tuesday, 7 am for video teleconferences, conference room at SWOCC (5th floor, room 505 Tioga Hall

Welcome New Members

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Coastal Sotheby’s International Realty 

Image result for coastal sothebys
Hunter Finch
196 S. 2nd St.
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-516-1850
hunter@coastalsothebysrealty.com
coastalsothebysrealty.com

The Tin Thistle Cafe

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people standing
Paula Holmes
541-267-0267
1972 Sherman Ave.
North Bend, OR 97459
p.e.l.holmes@gmail.com

“100% Vegan Cafe! House made-burgers, wraps, salads, specials, soups, desserts & Smoothies. Features beautiful outdoor garden with seating.”

Steve Holmes Tree Service 

Steve Holmes Tree Service
Steve Holmes-Licensed Professional
Coos Bay, OR
541-267-0706

“Take down and remove dangerous and difficult trees around buildings and sensitive areas.”

Day Star Exterior Cleaning 
DayStar Exterior Cleaning Services - Coos Bay Fresh

Day Star Exterior Cleaning
John Dooley
93677 #C Newport Ln.
Coos Bay, OR
541-435-7532
john@daystarcleaners.com
daystarcleaners.com

“We deliver the most reliable exterior cleaning services to give our clients satisfaction and peace of mine.  We help homeowners to restore the function and aesthetic value of their houses.”

Consumer Credit Counseling Service of SWO


Consumer Credit Counseling Service of SWO
Bill Ihle
820 Crater Ave #200
Medford, OR
541-779-2273
ihleb@improvedcredit.org
improvecredit.org

“We are the regions only community based Non-profit providing consumer counseling and financial education programs.  We provide counseling on credit reports, housing , personal and student loan counseling.”

Coos Comfort Furniture

Derria Lakey
290 N. Central Blvd. Coquille
541-824-1790
Cooscomfortfurniture@gmail.com
No photo description available.

Lighthouse Health & Wellness

Cindy Bartell
Dr. Michael Bartell, D.C., M.S., C.F.M.P
2182 Broadway Ave.
North Bend OR, 97459
541-808-9697
lighthousehealthandwellness@gmail.com
lighthousewellnessinstitute.com

North Bend OR. Chiropractor

Clausen Oysters

Jean Berry
541-756-3600
66234 North Bay Rd
North Bend, Oregon
info@clausenoysters.com
www.clausenoysters.com

Image result for clausen oysters logo coos bay

Bristol Event Center

Claudia & Joe Slack
481 Bennett.
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-297-7982
bristolpropertiesscb@gmail.com
facebook.com/BristolEventCenter

Image may contain: house

Samson Business Solutions
Linet Samson
541-294-0009
linet@samsonsolutions.net
www.samsonsolutions.net

Samson Solutions Logo

Personal Member
Steve Beetham
281-352-7483
steveb@dbwestern.com

Patty Sanden
1942 Sheridan Ave.
North Bend, OR 97459
541-756-3111
psanden@bayareafirststep.org
www.bayareafirststep.org
B&B Janitorial 
Kathy Keith 
1165 Newmark Ave #C 
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-756-4718
bbjanitorial@yahoo.com 
www.bandbjanitorialco.com 



Bay Eye Clinic
Mary Houghton
3585 Broadway Ave. 
North Bend, OR 97459
541-756-2584
mary@bayeyeclinic.com 
www.bayeyeclinic.com

Bayshore Paints, Inc
Christy & Trae Johnson 
1026 N. Bayshore Dr. 
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-267-2010 x 1
christy@bayshorepaints.net
www.bayshorepaints.net 

Bayshore Paints

Bridge to Healing
Linda Haga
320 Central Ave. Suite 413
Coos Bay, OR 97420
541-362-4325
bowenworkbrigetohealing@gmail.com 
www.bridgetohealingbowenwork.com 

Image result for bridge to healing logo coos bay

Bay Area Land Development 
Paul McKiddy 
PO Box 1316
North Bend, OR 97459
541-759-3478
paul@bayarealanddevelopment.com 

No photo description available.

Bahama Boards 
Greg Allen
650 Ivy St
Coos Bay
541-808-3535
bill.bahamasup@gmail.com 
www.bahamasup.com 

Image result for bahama boards coos bay oregon

Bandon Oregon Chamber of Commerce
Ruthie Painter
300 Second Street
Bandon, Oregon 97411
541-347-9616
ruthie@bandon.com 
www.bandon.com 



Oregon Coast Blinds
Benjamin Nelson
Bandon, Oregon
541-264-7296
benjamin@oregoncoastblinds.com 

No photo description available.


Member to Member Specials

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Shared office space for rent at Sol Suites – $260/month

  • Perfect for a satellite office, travelling business person, campaign headquarters, etc
  • Approximately 75 beautifully renovated rentable square feet
  • Convenient downtown Coos Bay location
    • full access to 826 square feet of common spaces
    • shower and bathroom facilities
    • use of high-tech Think Tank video conference room (separate list of amenities, please ask!)
    • includes electricity, gas, water, sanitary, 100Mbps Wifi access.
    • printer/copier available, pay per print
    • use of on site server with owner-supplied hard drive. The server is great for lots of secure file storage, user unlimited, and remote access for uploading and receiving (like a Dropbox).
  • If you are interested, come check us out! Please contact Ciera Milkewicz at 541-266-0877 or ciera@solcoast.com

Friends of Sol Suites and the Think Tank (current and previous tenants, Think Tank renters) – Sol Coast Consulting & Design, LLC, Visual Graphics and Design, Oregon Health and Science University’s Campus for Rural Health, 7 Devils Brewing Co., Ocean View Enterprises, Renew Oregon, Coos Watershed Association, Oregon Coast Music Association, Surfrider Foundation, Celebration of Oregon Science (COOS), Octoberfish Committee, Coquille Economic Development Corporation, and many more!

 

Private office space for rent at Sol Suites – $375/month

  • Full private office space at Sol Suites!
  • Approximately 100 beautifully renovated rentable square feet
  • Convenient downtown Coos Bay location
    • full access to 826 square feet of common spaces
    • shower and bathroom facilities
    • use of high-tech Think Tank video conference room (separate list of amenities, please ask!)
    • includes electricity, gas, water, sanitary, 100Mbps Wifi access.
    • printer/copier available, pay per print
    • use of on site server with owner-supplied hard drive. The server is great for lots of secure file storage, user unlimited, and remote access for uploading and receiving (like a Dropbox).
  • If you are interested, come check us out! Please contact Ciera Milkewicz at 541-266-0877 or ciera@solcoast.com

Friends of Sol Suites and the Think Tank (current and previous tenants, Think Tank renters) – Sol Coast Consulting & Design, LLC, Visual Graphics and Design, Oregon Health and Science University’s Campus for Rural Health, 7 Devils Brewing Co., Ocean View Enterprises, Renew Oregon, Coos Watershed Association, Oregon Coast Music Association, Surfrider Foundation, Celebration of Oregon Science (COOS), Octoberfish Committee, Coquille Economic Development Corporation, and many more!

 

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